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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 15 1 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, chapter 4 (search)
send from obscurity a Lincoln or a Grant in time of imminent need. Beyond all these, perhaps, in total influence ranks the great army of women teachers, spreading their unseen and daily labors through every school district from Cape Cod to the Golden Gate; smoothing the waste places, equalizing all our civilization, doing the most for the poorest; and again, in the upper regions of education, rising into the work of such missionaries of the highest training as Mary Lyon in the past, or Alice Freeman in the present. Compared with these lives, how petty seem the little struggles for position and etiquette? In what lingering childishness does the most exalted womanhood of Europe seem still to be involved when we read in the telegraphic headings, Great indignation of Queen Victoria, and find that this excitement relates, not to the tremendous Irish problem and the threatened dismemberment of her empire, but to the hesitation of certain courts of Europe to accord to Prince Henry Someth
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, Index. (search)
6. Epictetus, 297. Eumenides of Aeschylus, the plot of, 44. Eve, 7. exalted stations, 126. F. Family, the, among Australians, 45; in ancient Rome, 45. Farm, children on A, 197. fear of its being wasted, the, 232. Felix Holt, 78. Fielding, Henry, 11. Fields, J. T., 40. finer forces, 131. Fletcher, Alice C., 287. flood-tide of youth, the, 48. Florac, Madame de, 180. Fontenelle, B. le B. de, quoted, 85. Francomania, 26. Franklin, Benjamin, 296. Freeman, Alice, 21. French standards vs. English, 23, 98. Frenchmen, domesticity of, 281. Friends, marriages among, 47. Fuller, Margaret. See Ossoli. Furies, the, 44. G. Galahad, Sir, 296. Gallenga, A., 98. Garibaldi, Giuseppe, 309. Garrison, W. L., 18, 177. Garth, Caleb, 294. Gellius, Aulus, quoted, 97. Genlis, Madame de, 57, 179. German schools, drawbacks of, 246. Gerikiman standard, the, 243. Germany, influence of, 23, 134. Gibbon, Edward, 290. Gisborne, Thoma
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 5: the school of mobs (search)
al by which Whittier's Quaker training was tested, but it rang true. He would not arm himself, but he did not flinch where others were arming. His courage was to be once more tested, however, in Philadelphia, while he edited the Pennsylvania Freeman. A hall had been erected by the antislavery people and other reformers, and was first opened on May 15, 1838. There was an address by the eminent lawyer, David Paul Brown, and a poem of a hundred and fifty lines by Whittier, whose publishing of through its business amid the howling of the mob. The tumults lasted a week, and at the end of this time the mayor offered a reward for the arrest of the rioters, from which nothing followed. The summary of the whole affair in the Pennsylvania Freeman was written by Whittier and Charles Burleigh. It was practically the record of the poet's baptism into the second degree of reform — the period of mob violence. Years after, Whittier had a curious memorial of this period-- Once when he
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 7: Whittier as a social reformer (search)
f life and duty, it is not likely to prove a blessing in her hands any more than in man's. With great respect and hearty sympathy, I am very truly thy friend. Again he wrote, of a speech by that eminently clearheaded and able woman, Miss Alice Freeman, now Mrs. G. H. Palmer:-- Amesbury, 7th mo., 1881. Miss Freeman's speech was eloquent and wise — the best thing in the Institute. Perhaps even Francis Parkman might think she could be safely trusted to vote. These opinions, it wiln her hands any more than in man's. With great respect and hearty sympathy, I am very truly thy friend. Again he wrote, of a speech by that eminently clearheaded and able woman, Miss Alice Freeman, now Mrs. G. H. Palmer:-- Amesbury, 7th mo., 1881. Miss Freeman's speech was eloquent and wise — the best thing in the Institute. Perhaps even Francis Parkman might think she could be safely trusted to vote. These opinions, it will be seen, cover an interval of nearly half a centu
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 10: the religious side (search)
uggestive. On the night before the burning of Pennsylvania Hall in 1838, in Philadelphia, as an antislavery headquarters, there occurred the marriage of Angelina Grimke to Theodore D. Weld, both being afterwards prominent antislavery reformers. Miss Grimke was a South Carolina Quakeress, who had liberated her own slaves, and was thenceforward known far and wide as an antislavery lecturer, but her proposed husband was not a Quaker. At the time of her wedding, Whittier, who then edited the Freeman, was invited to attend; but as she was marrying out of society, he did not think it fitting that he should be present at the ceremony. He nevertheless reconciled it with his conscience to escort a young lady to the door, and to call on the wedded pair, next day, with a congratulatory poem. Pickard's Whittier, I. 235. This fairly indicates the hold his early religious training had upon him, when the question was one of outward observances alone. In reading, not merely Whittier's medit
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Index. (search)
, 126-128, 140, 152, 172, 173, 175. Fisher, Mary, 84. Fletcher, J. C., 166, 167. Follymill, 141. Folsom, Abby, 81. Fox, George, 116, 124. France, 97. Freeman, the, mentioned, 115. Free Press, the, mentioned, 23, 25, 73. Free Soil party, 68. Friends' Review, mentioned, 121; quoted, 122-124. Friends, Society ro II., Dom, his acquaintance with Whittier, 100, 101. Penn, William, 3, 119. Pennsylvania, 51, 52, 77. Pennsylvania Antislavery Society, 63. Pennsylvania Freeman, the, mentioned, 62, 65. Pennsylvania Hall, 115; burning of, 63, 64. Phelps, Amos A., 81. Phelps, William L., 137. Philadelphia, Penn., 6, 49-52, 62, 74, es to Garrison, 54, 55; encounters first violence in antislavery cause, 56; conceals George Thompson, 58; encounters with mobs, 58, 59, 61, 62; edits Pennsylvania Freeman, 62; burning of his Philadelphia office, 63, 64; memorial of mob period, 65; a leader of the Disunionists, 68; Garrison's tribute to, 72; his tribute to Garrison,