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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Unitarians, (search)
Unitarians, Frequently termed Socinians from Laelius Socinus, who founded a sect in Italy about 1546. In America Dr. James Freeman, of King's Chapel, Boston, in 1783, removed from the Prayer book of common prayers all reference to the Trinity or Deity and worship of Christ; his church became distinctly Unitarian in 1787. In 1801 the Plymouth Church declared itself Unitarian. Dr. William Ellery Channing (1780-1842) was the acknowledged head of this church until his death. The American Unitarian association was formed May 24, 1825; headquarters at Boston, Mass. The Western conference organized 1852, and a national Unitarian conference at New York City, April 5, 1865. Reports for 1900 showed: 550 ministers, 459 churches, and 71,000 members.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whittier, John Greenleaf 1807-1892 (search)
r of the American manufacturer, in Boston. The next year he was editing in Hartford, Conn.; and in 1832-36 he edited the Gazette, at Haverhill. His first publication of any pretension was his Legends of New England (1831). Others soon followed. As early as 1833 he began to battle for the freedom of the slaves, and he never ceased warfare until the slave system disappeared in 1863. He was elected secretary of the Anti-slavery Society in 1836, and edited, in Philadelphia, the Pennsylvania Freeman, devoted to its principles. In 1840 he removed to Amesbury, Mass., where he resided until about 1878, cultivating a small farm. In 1847 he became corresponding editor of the National era, an anti-slavery paper published at Washington, D. C. Mr. Whittier was a thoroughly American poet, and most of his verses were inspired by current events. The spirit of humanity, democracy, and patriotism expressed in his poems and prose writings made the public regard him with reverential affection. H
Hanover, April 25, 1810,--a lady of strong mind, of an amiable disposition, and of graceful bearing. They resided in Hancock Street, and were attendants of King's Chapel, of which Mr. Sumner was for some time the clerk, and of which the Rev. James Freeman, D. D., the Rev. F. W. P. Greenwood, D. D., and afterwards the Rev. Ephraim Peabody, D. D., were the eloquent pastors. Charles Sumner, whose name is intimately associated with the stirring political events as well as with the literature oen a popular school-book in Boston and vicinity, gave him great delight. He early became an excellent reader; and his speech, as might be well inferred from the influences of a home of culture, was naturally correct and easy. The eloquent Dr. James Freeman was his early pastor, and, with other learned gentlemen, a frequent visitor at the Sumner house, which was then, as afterwards, the centre of an intellectual and refined society. In accordance with Juvenal's idea, Maxima debetur puero r
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
ngregationalists, who took the first decisive step. In 1785, the congregation of King's Chapel, having adopted a modification of the Anglican liturgy, from which all Trinitarian doctrine had been omitted, ordained and installed as its rector James Freeman, who, together with William Hazlitt (father of the essayist), had performed the revision. This ordination is usually held to mark the formal beginning of Unitarianism in New England. The Rev. Joseph Buckminster (1751-1812) of Portsmouth, scholarly, eloquent, and saintly son was an immediate predecessor of Andrews Norton, and a contemporary of W. E. Channing, Charles Lowell, and Washington Allston at Harvard. But for his father's opposition, he might have become assistant to James Freeman, whom he heard with admiration at King's Chapel. He taught Daniel Webster Latin at Phillips Exeter, and tried to persuade his pupil to take part in the school exercises in public speaking. His work, in fact, is full of seeds which the futur
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
West than any other type of literature. Bret Harte, writing in 1899, mentioned as the leading short-story writers then living Joel Chandler Harris, George W. Cable, Mark Twain, Charles Egbert Craddock (Miss Murfree), and Mary E. Wilkins (now Mrs. Freeman). These names, together with that of Bret Harte himself, indicate that excellence in dialect and excellence in the short story have been almost synonymous in American literature since the Civil War. They indicate also that dialect has been bor, he pronounces ah. 7. To the dish thus seasoned add a drawl ad libitum. The New England dialect may perhaps best be studied in such later writers as Rose Terry Cooke, See Book III, Chap. VI. Sarah Orne Jewett, Ibid. and Mary E. Wilkins Freeman. Ibid. What is known as the Southern dialect may be formulated also in seven general rules: 1. Like does duty for as if in such sentences as He looks like he was sick. This construction, says Lowell, is never found in New England. 2.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
xample in Hamlin Garland's Crumbling Idols,—and then proceeded to work out its careful pictures with deliberate art. Garland's Main-Travelled Roads, stories of the settlement period of the Middle Border, have no golden light upon them. They tell the truth with brutal directness and they tell it with an art that convinces. They are not mere stories; they are living documents in the history of the West. So with the Maupassant-like pictures of later New England conditions by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, in A Humble Romance (1887) and A New England Nun (1891). If the florid, sentimental school of the mid-century went to one extreme, she went to the other. Nowhere in English may one find more of repression, more pitiless studies of repressed lives, more bare searchings into the soul of a decadent social system. She wrote with conviction and a full heart of the life from which she herself had sprung, yet she held herself so firmly in control that her pictures are as sharp and cold as engra
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
njamin, 148, 214, 215, 241 Franklin Evans, 262 Fredericksburg, 281 Freedom and War, 216 Freedom Wheeler's controversy with Providence, 373 Free Joe and other Georgian sketches, 352 n. Free Joe and the rest of the world, 352 n. Freeman, James, 206, 207 Freeman, Mary E. Wilkins, 360, 364, 382, 390 Freeman's journal, the, 299 Free press (Detroit), 182 Free press (Newburyport), The, 44 Freiligrath, P., 271 Fremont, John C., 283 French, Alice, 379, 388, 390 Freneau Wide, wide world, the, 398 Widow Bedott. See Whitcher, Frances Miriam Widow Bedott papers, the, 154 Widow Sprigg, Mary Elmer, and other sketches, 154 Wilberforce, William, 45 Wilde, Richard Henry, 167, 289 Wilkins, Mary E. See Freeman, Mary E. Wilkins William the Silent, 141 Williams College, 219, 223 Willis, Nathaniel, 399 Willis, N. P., 61, 63 n., 164, 167, 168, 173, 174, 187, 399 Williamson, Dr., Hugh, 106 William Wilson, 68 Willson, Forceythe, 281 Wil
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 6: South Boston 1844-1851; aet. 25-32 (search)
th that Julia needed a longer time of rest and refreshment; accordingly when he returned she, with the two little children, joined her sisters, both now married, and the three proceeded to Rome, where they spent the winter. Mrs. Crawford was living at Villa Negroni, where Mrs. Mailliard became her companion; Julia found a comfortable apartment in Via Capo le Case, with the Edward Freemans on the floor above, and Mrs. David Dudley Field on that below. These were pleasant neighbors. Mrs. Freeman was Julia's companion in many delightful walks and excursions; when Mrs. Field had a party, she borrowed Mrs. Howe's large lamp, and was ready to lend her tea-cups in return. There was a Christmas tree — the first ever seen in Rome!--at Villa Negroni; an occasional ball, a box at the opera, a drive on the Campagna. Julia found a learned Rabbi from the Ghetto, and resumed the study of Hebrew, which she had begun the year before in South Boston. This accomplished man was obliged to wea
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the wider outlookv1865; aet. 46 (search)
personal life antedating his own existence.... In his own sense, Christ was also newer than we are, for his doctrine is still beyond the attainment of all and the appreciation of most of us. There is no essential religious element in negation. Saw Booth in Hamlet --still first-rate, I think, although he has played it one hundred nights in New York. Hamlet is an aesthetic Evangel. I know of no direct ethical work which contains such powerful moral illustration and instruction. James Freeman [Clarke] does not think much of Sam's book, probably not as well as it deserves. But the knowledge of Sam's personality is the light behind the transparency in all that he does. Lyrical Ventures, by Samuel Ward. These were the closing months of the Civil War. All hearts were lifted up in thankfulness that the end was near. She speaks of it seldom, but her few words are significant. Monday, April 3.... Richmond was taken this morning. Laus Deo On April 10, after Maud's boots
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: no. 19
Boylston place
: later Lyrics --1866; aet. 47 (search)
eath be laid.” J. W. H. My first writing in the new house, where may God help and bless us all. May no dark action shade our record in this house, and if possible, no surpassing sorrow. After the wide sunny spaces of No. 13 Chestnut Street, the new house seemed small and dark; nor was Boylston Place even in those days a specially cheerful cul de sac; yet we remember it pleasantly enough as the home of much work and much play. November 19. Had the comforts of faith from dear James Freeman [Clarke] to-day. Felt restored to something like the peace I enjoyed before these two tasks of printing and moving broke up all leisure and all study. Determined to hold on with both hands to the largeness of philosophical pursuit and study, and to do my utmost to be useful in this connection and path of life .... Comforting myself with Hedge's book. Determined to pass no more godless days.... She began to read Grote's Plato, and the Journal contains much comment on the Platonic
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