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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Robert L. Freeman or search for Robert L. Freeman in all documents.

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gentlemanly, mild man. He is the third officer that has commanded the vessel. The first assigned was named McBlair, and it is said he was relieved because he did not run by the Yankees and go to sea. That, however, must be a mistake. The next commander was a St. Clair, and he died not long since. The executive officer, Mr. Alexander, is an old officer in our service, as is also Mr. Barbot, second officer and lieutenant for the war, and the third lieutenant, Mr. Arledge. The surgeon, Dr. Freeman, and the assistant surgeon, Dr. Gibbs, are old naval officers. The officers all appear to be gentlemen, and are much chagrined to think of their capture. It seems the Atlanta left Savannah about two weeks ago, intending to go to sea via Warsaw Sound, proceed to Port Royal, and do such destruction as might be permitted her, and then push on to Charleston, where she was to make a foray upon the fleet and then enter the city, although it was not understood in Charleston that this was int
ps marched from Jackson to Bolton, near twenty miles, that day, and next morning resumed the march by a road lying to the north of Baker's Creek, reaching Bridgeport on the Big Black at noon. There I found Blair's division and the pontoon train. The enemy had a small picket on the west bank in a rifle-pit, commanding the crossing, but on exploding a few shells over the pit they came out and surrendered, a lieutenant and ten men. The pontoon-bridge was laid across under the direction of Captain Freeman, and Blair's and Steele's divisions passed over that night, Tuttle's following next morning. Starting with the break of day we pushed rapidly, and by half-past 9 A. M., of May eighteenth, the head of the column reached the Benton road, and we commanded the Yazoo, interposing a superior force between the enemy at Vicksburgh and his forts on Yazoo. Resting a sufficient time to enable the column to close up, we pushed forward to the point where the road forks, and sending forward on each
competition between the three regiments of my brigade resulted, as it is likely to do in the future, in the complete rout and defeat of the foe. I must express my admiration for the coolness, bravery, and efficiency of my staff officers. Captains Freeman, Snelling, Lieutenants Haine and Johnson, who were exposed to the hottest of the fire and thickest of the danger, have my sincere thanks for their cordial support. Casualties, forty-three killed and wounded in my brigade proper. I have theavery, and efficiency of my staff officers. Captains Freeman, Snelling, Lieutenants Haine and Johnson, who were exposed to the hottest of the fire and thickest of the danger, have my sincere thanks for their cordial support. Casualties, forty-three killed and wounded in my brigade proper. I have the honor to be, Respectfully your ob't servant, J. M. Glover, Colonel Commanding Second Brigade, Cavalry Division. Robert L. Freeman, Captain and A. A. A. Gen. Second Brgade Cavalry Division.