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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
everywhere eager to hear. I am covered all over with applications to lecture in all parts of the free States. The many base attempts that have been made to cripple my influence, and to render me odious in the eyes of the people, have only served to awaken sympathy, excite curiosity, and to open a wide door for usefulness. Notice the large and harmonious meeting of the Eastern Pennsylvania A. S. Society at Philadelphia in December, 1841, at which, however, the temporary suspension of the Freeman in favor of the Standard was voted (Lib. 12: 2, 3, 7, 8). Of the numerous meetings and conventions now instituted, that at Nantucket in August was a conspicuous Aug. 10, 11, 12, 1841; Lib. 11.130, 134. example of the glad renewal of anti-slavery fellowship (the sectarian spirit having been exorcised), and was otherwise memorable. No report is left of the social delights of companionship between Bradburn (a sort of Geo. Bradburn. island host), Quincy, Garrison, and Collins; but the s
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ery forbid us, as Lib. 12.87. abolitionists, to continue in the American Union, or to swear to support the Federal Constitution. There is, writes H. C. Wright to Mr. Garrison from Philadelphia, Sept. 4, 1840 (Ms.), a short communication in the Freeman of yesterday, signed J. D. (Joshua Dungan), Bucks County. A leading abolitionist of the Co., who was for a time carried off with New Organizers at N. Y. Now in his right mind. He takes the ground that no true-hearted abolitionist can consisten. for desertion (not without cause), receiving one hundred and fifty lashes: he names the ships to which the launches were successively taken, and the fellow-sufferer who died Cf. Penn. under the terrible infliction. In January, 1824, he had Freeman, Mar. 25, 1847, p. 1. escaped to New York, and in September shipped for the first time in the United States navyin the North Carolina seventy-four at Norfolk. I considered myself, he records, an adept in the usages of a man-of-war; but I was mi
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
itionist, and most zealous and generous promoter of the temperance, as lecturer and journalist (Lib. 27: 92). etc., from the cause East; Arnold Buffum, from the West; Thomas Earle, with C. C. Burleigh and J. M. McKim, editors of the Pennsylvania Freeman, and Thomas S. Cavender of Philadelphia; and James S. Gibbons of New York. Mr. Child, in accordance with a notice already given, withdrew from the editorship of the Standard, and was replaced by a committee of three, consisting of Sydney Howard in controversy, pointing Lib. 14: 102. out to those political abolitionists who urged rather amendment of the Constitution, that this was synonymous with dissolution, in fact and in the eyes of the South. So J. M. McKim, in the Pennsylvania Freeman, argued justly that the pretence that the Constitution was anti-slavery was a tacit admission that, if it were pro-slavery, dissolution would be a duty (Lib. 14: 105). Francis Jackson himself resigned to the Ms., and Lib. 14: 125. Gov ernor o
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
lled autobiographic. It has been already cited (ante, 1.13-15). It was copied in part in the National A. S. Standard (7.96, 100), and in full in the Pennsylvania Freeman of Mar. 25, 1847. Readers of the first two volumes of the present work will notice some slight discrepancies in Mrs. Howitt's narrative, as was to be expected unnot a moment to say that, other things being equal, a slaveholder of any description ought to be excluded from the communion of the churches (Lib. 16: 185; Penn. Freeman, June 11, 1846, p. 2). They commended to the consideration of the Lib. 16:[154]. several branches of the Alliance social evils like the profanation of the Lord'sdiscernment of character and more exquisite portraiture than in these lines, written as a Letter from Boston to the editor of the Lib. 17.6, and Ms. Pennsylvania Freeman, by James Russell Lowell: Dear M., Jas. Miller McKim. By way of saving time, The letter is post-marked Dec. 27, 1846. I'll do this letter up in rhyme, Whose
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
d, or merged in Douglass's paper! Strange want of forecast and judgment. But no more now. Douglass had returned to America a free man, his English friends having negotiated his ransom (Lib. 17: 10). Mr. Garrison not only contributed while abroad to the amount raised for this purpose (Lib. 17.10), but justified Douglass in consenting to be freed by purchase—a point as to which the abolitionists were curiously divided, the scruple being shared by the editors of the Standard, Pennsylvania Freeman, and Bugle, and by many subscribers to the Liberator. Some Liberty Party editors were horrified. (See Lib. 17: 10,11,18, 26, 38,46,47.) We would rather, said Mr. Garrison (Lib. 17: 38), if this must be the alternative, that the most exorbitant pecuniary exactions of the slave tyrants should be complied with than that their victims should never be set free. We deny, he said further, in reply to the position taken by the Philadelphia Female A. S. Society, that such a purchase is necessarily
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
, Vermont, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, within a comparatively short period, where conscientious and upright persons have been thrust into prison for an act no more intrinsically heinous than that of gathering in a crop of hay, or selling moral or philanthropic publications. Allusion is here made to the case of Charles C. Burleigh, who in February, 1847, was twice put in jail in West Chester, Pa. (the second time for six days), for selling anti-slavery books on Sunday (Lib. 17.54, 59; Penn. Freeman, Mar. 25, 1847). For the conviction of a Seventh-Day Baptist farmer for working, in Pennsylvania, on Sunday, see Lib. 18: 119. There is, therefore, no liberty of conscience allowed to the people of this country, under the laws thereof, in regard to the observance of a Sabbath day. The last sentence originally read, . . . observance or non-observance of the first day of the week as a holy day. In addition to these startling facts, within the last five years a religious combination has
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
the testimony of an earnest Covenanter (and therefore anti-slavery) clergyman in regard to Mr. Garrison's habit: He opened the meetings of the Anti-Slavery Society by reading the Scriptures; and he read them from the depths of his soul, with a power I have yet to hear equalled ( Life and work of J. R. W. Sloane, D. D., p. 84). We quote above from the account of the Rynders mob written by Dr. Furness for a friend of his in Congress, but allowed to be published anonymously in the Pennsylvania Freeman of May 23, 1850 (Lib. 20: 81). We shall also have occasion to use another account from the same hand, printed on pp. 28-35 of the pamphlet commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of his ordination (Philadelphia, 1875), and reprinted in the Boston Commonwealth of Jan. 24, 1885. The reading of the Treasurer's report followed, and then Mr. Garrison, resigning the chair to Francis Jackson, proceeded to make the first speech of the day. He held in his hand the text or notes of his discourse,
is said at the present time, and perhaps not too much, in regard to the Fugitive Slave Law. Many persons glory in their hostility to it, and upon this capital they set up an antislavery reputation. But opposition to that law is no proof in itself of anti-slavery fidelity. That law is merely incidental to slavery, and there is no merit in opposition which extends no further than to its provisions. Our warfare is not against slave-hunting alone, but against the existence of slavery. Penn. Freeman. What is stranger, perhaps, Uncle Tom did not tell on the vote of the anti-slavery political party in this Presidential year, 1852. To this party we must now give some attention, beginning with a retrospect. Nothing, said the editor of the Liberator, in January, 1849, can be more superficial or more destitute of principle than the Free Soil movement Lib. 19.6, 7.; and at the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society in the same month, Wendell Jan. 24-26. Phillips moved
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
h gatherings in the State of Connecticut, in view of the announcement Proceedings Hartford Bible Convention, p. 371. that another Bible Convention would be held in January, 1854. An excursion to Flushing, Long Island, in August, to take part in the celebration of West India emancipation Aug. 4, 1853; Lib. 23.129. under the management of the New York City Anti-Slavery Society, This organization was consequent upon the transfer of Oliver Johnson from the editorship of the Pennsylvania Freeman to the associate editorship (with S. H. Gay) of the National Anti-Slavery Standard (Lib. 23: 47, 50, [78], 107). broke for a moment Mr. Garrison's summer rest. By the end of the same month, he was on his way to New York to share in an extraordinary series of meetings crowded into a single week. In May a so-called World's Temperance Convention had been held in that city, under the customary clerical auspices, and, though Lib. 23:[84]; Hist. Woman Suffrage, 1.499. consenting at first to ad