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Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 13 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 4 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 1 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Freemantle or search for Freemantle in all documents.

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ral and remarked to him that the gunboat was evidently getting its range, and he should not expose his person needlessly. The general very calmly answered, Captain, we must all take our risks. Afterward, the manner of his death at Shiloh impressed the incident permanently on my memory. But, in fact, his conduct on that occasion was not rash, but wise. He doubtless was aware of that defect of new troops (to which General Joseph E. Johnston subsequently alluded in a conversation with Colonel Freemantle), in refusing full confidence, even to a commander-in-chief, unless they had seen him under fire. The rising ground back of the bluff was filled with those soldiers who were not under arms or on duty at the time, and their admiration, as they saw the tall form of the general, standing in full uniform next the battery, and in full view from the gunboat, was evidenced by loud cheers. On one occasion only did General Johnston have a case presented to him in which my knowledge of the