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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
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lly, not feeling strong-hearted enough for the task, gave them to Cradle with directions to sew up the small holes. I came into the tent soon after, and he was drawing a portrait, with a piece of charcoal, on a board. That's a good portrait of Fremont, said I, he looks just like that; that's the way he parts his hair, in the middle. That isn't a portrait of Fremont, said Billy, it's a map of the United States; that line in the middle you thought was the upper part in his hair, is the MississFremont, said Billy, it's a map of the United States; that line in the middle you thought was the upper part in his hair, is the Mississippi River. Oh!, said I. I saw him again before supper; he came to me, looking worse than ever, the stockings in his hand. Jimmy, said he, you know I gave them to Cradle and told him to sew up the small holes, and what do you think he's done? He's gone and sewed up the heads. It's a hard case, Jimmy, said I, in such a case tears are almost justifiable.
people be. He laughs at a wound, thoa he never has felt it, And glories in blood, thoa he never has smelt it. With a shrug of his shoulders that rustles his “bobs,” He wonders, “what next from the Cabinet snobs?” “Will Russell (the Cockney!) be thrown in the sea?” “Will the princes of Bourbon both Brigadiers be?” Le Baton most familiarly nicks the high names; Says, “the old codger (Scott) is always up with his sprains;” “Little Mac,” for McClellan, for Seward, says “Billy.” Talks of “Johnnie Fremont,” and of “Jessie, his filly.” And all of these things with a sodlier-like air, With a swagger and swell and a saucer-eyed stare, As becomes the great stick--Le Baton Militaire. Macaulay gave glory to Hall of Navarre With his oriflamme plume, as a signal afar, For the thick of the scrimmage — the tide of the war; But, bless you, 'twas nought to the one I exalt In the praise of this hero, who never cries “Halt!” “Nor” Charge! “for that matter, (f
Gen. Fremont attended service at Henry Ward Beecher's church, and the congregation rose en masse as the General and Mrs. Fremont entered. Mr. Beecher's discourse was on Greatness. After the service, the people made a rush for the General's pew, and detained him half an hour with hand-shaking; and when he was seated in his carriage, at the churchdoor, they crowded the street and gave him three cheers. Gen. Fremont attended service at Henry Ward Beecher's church, and the congregation rose en masse as the General and Mrs. Fremont entered. Mr. Beecher's discourse was on Greatness. After the service, the people made a rush for the General's pew, and detained him half an hour with hand-shaking; and when he was seated in his carriage, at the churchdoor, they crowded the street and gave him three cheers.