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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 124 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan organizing the grand Army. (search)
, but which, unfortunately for him, produced only a directly contrary result. On the evening of November 1st the whole political world of Washington was in a flutter of agitation. It labored still under the effects of the displacement of General Fremont, guilty of having intruded upon political ground by the issue of an abolitionist proclamation [see Vol. I., p. 278]. The disgrace of The Pathfinder, so popular with the Western Republicans, had caused some friction in Congress, and had provmaging to a general, whose functions forbid even the suspicion of political partisanship. The measure in question was inept, since it virtually restricted McClellan within the Department of the Potomac, excluding West Virginia, then assigned to Fremont. The measure was especially disastrous in suppressing all general direction of military operations, and disintegrating the ensemble. It had been decided that Scott was too superannuated to attend to this general direction; it was not for the pu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
d about one hundred and fifteen miles north-west of Richmond), probably as many as I wanted; on the 11th, that McCall's force had embarked to join me on the day preceding, and that it was intended to send the residue of General McDowell's force to join me as speedily as possible, and that it was clear that a strong force was operating with Jackson for the purpose of preventing the forces there from joining me. on the 26th the Secretary telegraphed that the forces of McDowell, Banks, and Fremont would be consolidated as the Army of Virginia, and would operate promptly in my aid by land. fortunately for the Army of the Potomac, however, I entertained serious doubts of the aid promised by the land route, so that, on the 18th, I ordered a number of transports, with supplies of all kinds, to be sent up the James, under convoy of the gun-boats, so that I might be free to cut loose from the Pamunkey and move over to the James, should circumstances enable me or render it desirable to d
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.33 (search)
West Virginia operations under Fremont. a continuation of McClellan in West Virginia. see Voltch of it must suffice. On the 29th of March Fremont assumed command of the Mountain Department, ie therefore all that ever proved feasible. Fremont had formed a plan of campaign which consisted by way of the Cheat Mountain Pass. From Monterey Fremont intended to move upon Staunton and thencerket. Blenker's division had not yet reached Fremont, who was waiting for it at Petersburg. Jacksinia. on the 8th, and the latter calling upon Fremont for help, Schenck was sent forward to support meeting and joining him in this movement. Fremont resumed preparations for his original campaig by concentration of McDowell's, Banks's, and Fremont's troops; but it was too late to remedy the i command all the troops in northern Virginia, Fremont was relieved by his own request, and the Mouning Lewisburg. We were thus prepared to join Fremont's column when it should approach Christiansbu[3 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
n, and Winchester on May 23d, 24th, and 25th; Fremont at Cross Keys on June 8th; Tyler at Port Repu, Banks had 9178 present for duty ; May 31st, Fremont had 14,672 (Cox and Kelley not in the Valley) depended upon Jackson's ability to hold back Fremont, Banks, and McDowell long enough to let Johnss entire force to Staunton, to be followed by Fremont. Jackson had collected, from Charlottesvil precipitately toward Franklin, to unite with Fremont. The route lay along a narrow valley hedged nd into any other mountain-pass through which Fremont could reach the valley at or south of Harrisont toward McDowell, with an unknown force; so Fremont did not attempt that route, but sent his cavan continued to Harrisonburg, hotly pursued by Fremont, but avoiding a conflict. The news of Banke Luray Valley in all haste to cooperate with Fremont. Jackson was advised of Shields's approach, bridge at Port Republic, after Ewell had held Fremont in check some time on the west side of the ri[16 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Notes on the battle of McDowell. (search)
Ashby's cavalry or any force of the rebels in pursuit. At Franklin we kept Jackson with his whole force at bay with our still much inferior numbers, until General Fremont arrived there on the 13th of May. With the troops I had left behind at Franklin, when I marched to the relief of Milroy, I had at no time before Fremont arriFremont arrived to take command more than 6500 men. On the 8th of May, Fremont was at Petersburg on his march from Lost Creek to Franklin, and certainly nowhere within less than 50 or 60 miles of McDowell. That was poor supporting distance. Ii.--extracts from the report of General R. H. Milroy. May 7th I was first advised by my scoutsFremont was at Petersburg on his march from Lost Creek to Franklin, and certainly nowhere within less than 50 or 60 miles of McDowell. That was poor supporting distance. Ii.--extracts from the report of General R. H. Milroy. May 7th I was first advised by my scouts and spies that a junction had been effected between the armies of Generals [Stonewall] Jackson and [Edward] Johnson, and that they were advancing to attack me at McDowell. Having the day previous sent out a large portion of the 3d West Virginia and 32d and 75th Ohio Regiments to Shaw's Ridge and upon Shenandoah Mountain for the p
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., I. (search)
Ashby's cavalry or any force of the rebels in pursuit. At Franklin we kept Jackson with his whole force at bay with our still much inferior numbers, until General Fremont arrived there on the 13th of May. With the troops I had left behind at Franklin, when I marched to the relief of Milroy, I had at no time before Fremont arri left behind at Franklin, when I marched to the relief of Milroy, I had at no time before Fremont arrived to take command more than 6500 men. On the 8th of May, Fremont was at Petersburg on his march from Lost Creek to Franklin, and certainly nowhere within less than 50 or 60 miles of McDowell. That was poor supporting distance. left behind at Franklin, when I marched to the relief of Milroy, I had at no time before Fremont arrived to take command more than 6500 men. On the 8th of May, Fremont was at Petersburg on his march from Lost Creek to Franklin, and certainly nowhere within less than 50 or 60 miles of McDowell. That was poor supporting distance.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.38 (search)
audecker; 3d Del., Col. William 0. Redden; 1st Md., P. H. B., Col. William P. Maulsby; Purnell Legion, Md., Col. William J. Leonard; 3d Md., Col. David P. De Witt; 1st D. C., Col. James A. Tait; 8th and 12th U. S. (battalion), Capt. Thomas G. Pitcher; Naval Battery, Lieut. C. H. Daniels. The loss in Saxton's command was 1 killed, 6 wounded, and 8 captured or missing = 15. The forces consisted of not more than 7000 effective men. (See Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 641.) Fremont's command, June 1st-9th, 1862. Major-General John C. Fremont. Staff loss: k, 1. Blenker's division, Brig.-Gen. L. Blenker. Staff loss: w, 2. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Julius Stahel: 8th N. Y., Col. Francis Wutschel (w); 39th N. Y.; 41st N. Y., Col. Leopold von Gilsa (w), Maj. Detleo von Einsiedel; 45th N. Y., Col. George von Amsberg; 27th Pa., Col. Adolphus Buschbeck; 2d N. Y. Battery, Capt. Louis Schirmer, Lieut. Hermann Jahn; C, W. Va. Art'y, Capt. Frank Buell. Brigade loss: k, 6
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Union Army. (search)
audecker; 3d Del., Col. William 0. Redden; 1st Md., P. H. B., Col. William P. Maulsby; Purnell Legion, Md., Col. William J. Leonard; 3d Md., Col. David P. De Witt; 1st D. C., Col. James A. Tait; 8th and 12th U. S. (battalion), Capt. Thomas G. Pitcher; Naval Battery, Lieut. C. H. Daniels. The loss in Saxton's command was 1 killed, 6 wounded, and 8 captured or missing = 15. The forces consisted of not more than 7000 effective men. (See Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 641.) Fremont's command, June 1st-9th, 1862. Major-General John C. Fremont. Staff loss: k, 1. Blenker's division, Brig.-Gen. L. Blenker. Staff loss: w, 2. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Julius Stahel: 8th N. Y., Col. Francis Wutschel (w); 39th N. Y.; 41st N. Y., Col. Leopold von Gilsa (w), Maj. Detleo von Einsiedel; 45th N. Y., Col. George von Amsberg; 27th Pa., Col. Adolphus Buschbeck; 2d N. Y. Battery, Capt. Louis Schirmer, Lieut. Hermann Jahn; C, W. Va. Art'y, Capt. Frank Buell. Brigade loss: k, 6
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. (search)
rg road, about a mile from the battle-field of Seven Pines, in command of a division of the Confederate army, I received an order from General Lee to report immediately at his quarters on the Mechanicsville road. On approaching the house which the general occupied, I saw an officer leaning over the yard-paling, dusty, travel-worn, and apparently very tired. He raised himself up as I dismounted, and I recognized General Jackson, who till that moment I had supposed was confronting Banks and Fremont far down the Valley of Virginia. He said that he had ridden fifty-two miles since 1 o'clock that morning, having taken relays of horses on the road. We went together into General Lee's office. General Jackson declined refreshments, courteously tendered by General Lee, but drank a glass of milk. Soon after, Generals Longstreet and A. P. Hill came in, and General Lee, closing the door, told us that he had determined to attack the Federal right wing, and had selected our four commands to e
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.51 (search)
some man, even in his advanced life. He seemed fresh from West point, so trim was his figure and so elastic his step. Out of battle he was as gentle as a woman, but when the clash of arms came he loved fight, and urged his battle with wonderful determination. As a usual thing he was remarkably well-balanced — always so, except on one or two occasions of severe trial when he failed to maintain his exact equipoise. Lee's orders were always well considered and well chosen. He depended almost too much on his officers for their execution. Jackson was a very skillful man against such men as Shields, Banks, and Fremont, but when pitted against the best of the Federal commanders he did not appear so well. Without doubt the greatest man of rebellion times, the one matchless among forty millions for the peculiar difficulties of the period, was Abraham Lincoln. General Heintzelman's headquarters at Nelson's House, June 30, during the battle of Glendale: from a sketch made at the time
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