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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 172 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 152 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 120 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 113 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 107 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 106 6 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 102 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 89 15 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 68 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Fremont or search for Fremont in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 3 document sections:

Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
the Valley to Manassas, was ordered back to destroy this bold soldier; and Blenker, with ten thousand men on his way to Fremont, was instructed to report to him as he followed Jackson up the Valley, where later the latter took up position at Swift on, and six thousand men, under Milroy and Schenck, had moved west of the mountains, and were in front of Johnson, while Fremont was marching with ten thousand men to join them. Evading Banks at Harrisonburg, Jackson moved to Staunton, joined hiward Washington, being directed to send twenty thousand men of his command at once to the Shenandoah Valley to reinforce Fremont, who had moved down the Valley to get in Jackson's rear and capture him. McClellan wanted McDowell badly, and McDowell dn time, having disposed of Banks, determined to prevent the union of Shields (who had arrived from McDowell's army) with Fremont, and by a series of brilliant manceuvres fought the battles of Cross Keys and Port Republic, holding one commander at ar
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 8: commands the army defending Richmond, and seven days battles. (search)
e with ten thousand rebels. Other reports placed Jackson at Port Republic, Harrisonburg, and Luray, and that neither McDowell, who was at Manassas, nor Banks and Fremont, who were at Middletown, appear to have any knowledge of Jackson's whereabouts. On the day Jackson arrived at Ashland McClellan was engaged in pushing Heintzelmaommander in chief of all the Federal armies. He was singularly unfortunate in the selection of the officers to fill these two important places. The forces of Fremont, Banks, and McDowell were united into what was termed the Army of Virginia, and its command was assigned to Major-General John Pope. This officer, a Kentuckian ble on July 19th, and at once began to consider the best way to strike Pope. Finding that his antagonist had practically concentrated the corps of Sigel (formerly Fremont's), Banks's, and McDowell's, and had nearly six times his numbers, he wisely decided to apply to General Lee for more troops before he assumed the offensive. On
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
ntioned, 182. Floyd, John B., 113, 117-119, 123, 125, 134. Fort Brown, Texas, 65, 66. Fort Donelson taken by Grant, 131. Fort Fisher, fall of, 368. Fort Hamilton, 30. Fort Henry captured, 131. Fort Monroe, 75, 135, 137, 308. Fort Moultrie, 87. Fort Sumter, 86, 87, 101. Fourth United States Infantry, 327. Foy, General, quoted, 56. Forrest, General N. B., 24. Franklin, General William B., mentioned, 138, 140, 194, 196, 206, 226, 228. Fredericksburg, battle of 222. Fremont, General John 6., 143, 179. French, General, mentioned, 230. Fry, Colonel D. B., at Fredericksburg, 296. Gaines Mill, battle of, 145, 169. Garland, General, killed, 207. Garnett, General, mentioned, 207, 294, 296; killed at Gettysburg, 294. Garnett, Robert S., mentioned, 102, 113. General Orders No. 1, Lee's, 368. George . mentioned, 79. Germania Ford, 243. Gettysburg, battle of, 142, 270; losses in, 302. Gettysburg and Vicksburg, 309; removal of dead, 409;