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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 172 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 152 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 120 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 113 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 107 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 106 6 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 106 14 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 102 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 89 15 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 68 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 5, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fremont or search for Fremont in all documents.

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rte testimony in secret. Partisan ever were informed they were to be tried, and convicted, and stigmatized, and hung up to fester infamy; and, as a case in point, he said the committee had privily and clandestinely gathered evidence against General Fremont to blast his character as a citizen and soldier at the time he was in command of an army. They never informed General Fremont that he was aspersed, nor gave him the names of the witnesses against him and they afforded him no opportunity forGeneral Fremont that he was aspersed, nor gave him the names of the witnesses against him and they afforded him no opportunity for defence. What good Mr. Conkling asked, had the committee done to affect the harm? He was not aware that one single fraud had been developed by the committee which remained unearthed at the time they pretended to dig it up. Mr. Conkling the Speaker what time remained to him. The Speaker replied eighteen minutes. Mr. Dawes, (Rep) of Mass.--The time will be extended to the gentleman. Mr. Washburne (Rep) of Illinois-- to that. Mr. Conkling--I knew that, and do you know how I kno
The Daily Dispatch: may 5, 1862., [Electronic resource], Symptoms of yellow fever in the South. (search)
old it for the present, and patiently await the issue of events. We may state, however, that the troops are in fine health and spirits, and confident of a victory over the army of General Rosecrans, (who has superseded Banks in the Valley,) in the battle which is believed to be inevitable. The Lynchburg papers report that the enemy are falling back down the Valley, while our troops have made an advance towards Harrisonburg, in pursuit. We find in a Philadelphia paper of April 30th an intimation that the Confederates are preparing to evacuate Yorktown, coupled with the remark that it is time McDowell, Banks and Fremont were getting their columns within short supporting distance of each other. We have no doubt Gen. Jackson is fully advised of all the movements of the enemy. We learned last evening that the enemy's forces, so far from retreating down the Valley, were within thirteen miles of Staunton on Saturday, and that Gen. Jackson was making due preparations to meet them.