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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 90 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 64 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 40 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 30 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 29 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. C. Fremont or search for J. C. Fremont in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 6 document sections:

reports injurious to the United States soldiers in Missouri. Is there a Senator here, a citizen of this land, who will say that the slightest color of authority exists on the part of a military officer for depriving a citizen of liberty or property without a warrant of law, or to suppress the freedom of the press? And we are told by the same despatch that the proprietors of the paper submitted, and intended to make an appeal. To whom? To the judicial authorities? No, sir, but to Major-General Fremont, when he should reach St. Louis. The civil authorities of the country are paralyzed, and practical martial law is being established all over the land. The like never happened in this country before, and it would not be tolerated in any country in Europe which pretends to the elements of civilization and liberty. George Washington carried the thirteen colonies through the war of the Revolution without martial law. The President of the United States could not conduct the Government
ted for the inhuman outrages perpetrated in Missouri, under the countenance of the brutal proclamations issued by the Lincoln leaders, Lyon, Curtis, Pope, and others, I will give at least this assurance, that, expecting better things from Major-General Fremont, the State authorities will doubtless afford him an early opportunity of determining whether the war is hereafter to be conducted by his forces and partisans in accordance with civilized usages. The shooting of women and children, the finott, Mr. Bass, and other distinguished citizens, the murder of Dr. Palmer, the summary shooting of unarmed men in North Missouri, without the form even of drum-head court-martial, and many other transactions sanctioned or left unpunished by General Fremont's predecessors, are barbarities which would disgrace even Camanches. If like acts cannot hereafter be prevented by motives of humanity, considerations of an enlightened military policy may be awakened in him by the retaliation which, in sub
Doc. 153.-Gen. Fremont's expedition. St. Louis, Aug. 1. Unusual interest has been created by the unwonted military activity which has followed the arrival of Major-General Fremont in St. Louis. Regiments have been constantly arriving, the city has been fairly thronged with troops; eight steamboats have been preparing fMajor-General Fremont in St. Louis. Regiments have been constantly arriving, the city has been fairly thronged with troops; eight steamboats have been preparing for their transportation down the river, and on last evening there were strong indications that the great fleet was about to move. The commanding general of this department has not seen proper to inform the public accurately beforehand with respect to the precise objects of his enterprise, plans of his campaign, or date of the depa Empress, moved into the landing. At eleven o'clock last night, the fleet and embarked troops remained awaiting complete readiness and orders to start. Major-General Fremont and staff went on board the City of Alton, to accompany and direct the expedition. Captain Bart Able is in charge of the fleet. The captains of the sever
ut the State--such as arresting citizens who have neither taken up arms against the Government, nor aided those who are in open hostility to it, and searching private houses without any reasonable ground to suspect the occupants of any improper conduct, and unnecessarily seizing or injuring private property. Such acts must be, and will be, discountenanced, and there is every reason to believe, from a general order recently issued by Lieut.-Gen. Scott, and from the known disposition of Maj.-Gen. Fremont, whose command embraces Missouri, that such oppressive conduct on the part of the military will, in a short time, be arrested. There exists in many parts of the State a most unfortunate and unnatural condition of feeling among citizens, amounting to actual hostility, and leading often to scenes of violence and bloodshed; and even neighbors of the same race have come to regard each other as enemies. This feeling, too, has originated in questions of a political character, although th
le of Wilson's Creek, Mo. this battle is variously known as that of Wilson's Creek, Springfield, and oak hill. General Fremont's report. Headquarters Western Department, St. Louis, August 13, 1861. Col. E. D. Townsend:-- Gen. Lyon, in e continued his retreat upon Rolla, bringing off his baggage trains and $250,000 in specie from the Springfield Bank. J. C. Fremont, Major-General Commanding. Report of Major Sturgis. Headquarters, Army of the West, Camp Carey Gratz, near R a list of the killed and wounded as soon as possible. Respectfully, T. J. Hughes. --Western Argus, Mo. General Fremont's order. General orders no. 4Headquarters, Western Department, St. Louis, Mo., August 25, 1861. I. The off of the Government. V. This order will be read at the head of every company in this Department. By order of Major-General Fremont. J. C. Kelton, Assistant Adjutant-General. A rebel shout of exultation. The victory in Missouri is glori
s is a just reward for the thirty-five men and children butchered by him on the 10th of May in St. Louis. I will furnish you a list of the killed and wounded as soon as possible. Respectfully, T. J. Hughes. --Western Argus, Mo. General Fremont's order. General orders no. 4Headquarters, Western Department, St. Louis, Mo., August 25, 1861. I. The official reports of the commanding officers of the forces engaged in the battle near Springfield, Mo., having been received, thet distinguished for important services and marked gallantry, will be communicated to the War Department for the consideration of the Government. V. This order will be read at the head of every company in this Department. By order of Major-General Fremont. J. C. Kelton, Assistant Adjutant-General. A rebel shout of exultation. The victory in Missouri is gloriously confirmed; Lyon is killed and Siegel in flight and believed to be captured; Sweeney is killed, and Southwestern Missour