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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Strasburg Fremont or search for Strasburg Fremont in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
west of the Alleghanies, reported to him that Fremont with a large army was moving rapidly south, wles from Strasburg. Through this gap between Fremont and Shields, Jackson was to make his escape. ed his spoils ahead, and when he reached Strasburg Fremont was three miles to his right and Shieldss Winder and the Stonewall brigade up to meet Fremont. Winder sent orders to Colonel Johnson that himself up the valley in a seventy-mile race, Fremont closing in behind, and Shields pushing up thehousand men and Shields with eight thousand. Fremont was a dashing and imprudent soldier and Shields a headlong Irishman. Fremont's cavalry was commanded by Sir Percy Wyndham, an Englishman, a so Maj. Robideau Wheat of Wheat's battalion. Fremont mounted a considerable force of infantry in w the Blue Ridge, where he could head off both Fremont and Shields, and if necessary, dodge through d the river in his rear, he offered battle to Fremont against odds of three to one. Fremont attack[4 more...]
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: Marylanders in 1862 under Gen. Robert E. Lee. (search)
Chapter 7: Marylanders in 1862 under Gen. Robert E. Lee. After Cross Keys and Port Republic, when Fremont and Shields were sent whirling down the valley, Jackson made a feint of pursuit, and pushed his cavalry some marches after them. He ordered the First Maryland to Staunton to recruit, where, during the next ten days, Company I was mustered out on June 17th, its time having expired. These men .left the regiment with the respect of the whole command and the love of their colonel. Theind, at Monterey, or in the army of Northern Virginia. At Staunton the regiment was reinforced with a new company under Capt. John H. Barry, which was designated Company G. About June 24th Jackson made a sudden disappearance from the front of Fremont, and reappeared on Lee's left on the Chickahominy. He picked up the First Maryland at Staunton, and moved by train. On the 25th he reached Ashland on the Richmond, Fredericksburg and Potomac railroad, fifteen miles north of Richmond, and at
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
e was put in command of a brigade at Evansport, with the duty of erecting batteries and blockading the river against Federal shipping. Subsequently he was assigned to the command of a brigade of Ewell's division, which he accompanied to the support of Jackson in the Valley campaign of 1862 In this famous series of glorious battles and brilliant maneuvers he bore a conspicuous part, and at Cross Keys was particularly distinguished, where in command of two brigades, he repulsed the attack of Fremont, and being reinforced, in turn advanced and routed the enemy. During the Seven Days battles before Richmond, his brigade continued to be distinguished, particularly at Cold Harbor, where Trimble led in person a successful charge against the Federal defenses. Moving with Jackson's command against Pope, he fought his men with gallantry at Slaughter's Mountain; and at the time when Jackson lay in the enemy's rear at Bristoe Station, he was roused on the night of August 27th to receive notice