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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
ffected early in the spring of 1862, and we were soon posted to guard the batteries at Chaffin's Bluff and the entire district from Richmond to Williamsburg, on the James, Chickahominy and Pamunkey rivers. To the four regiments commanded by Colonel Powhatan R. Page, of the 26th, Colonel J. Thomas Goode, of the 34th, Colonel J. H. Richardson, of the 46th, and Colonel W. B. Tabb, of the 59th, were added two batteries of artillery under Major A. W. Starke, commanded by Captains Armistead and French, with a few cavalry for videttes. This small force did post duty at Chaffin's for sixteen months, from April, 1862, until September, 1863. During that time they scouted the enemy incessantly, and so effectually as to keep them close to their seventeen redoubts at Williamsburg. The 59th was stationed mostly at the Diascund, its rangers keeping the miserable 5th Pennsylvania Cavalry timidly at bay. Under orders, they guarded the River road whilst the battles around Richmond were going on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
2, and by Charles C. Blacknall, May, 1862—more than a year before he became colonel of the regiment. The office of adjutant, subsequent to original organization, was held respectively by Vines E. Turner, of Granville, commissioned May, 1862; Junius French, of Yadkin, June, 1863; Thomas F. Powell, of Richmond, July, 1863, and by Lawrence T. Everett, of Richmond, May, 1864. The first quartermaster of the regiment was Edwin G. Cheatham, of Granville, commissioned July, 1861; succeeded by W. I. Eed and seventy wounded. It was with a force much reduced that the regiment entered the first day's fight at Gettysburg. It must have been a small command at that battle, although it exhibited the nerve and endurance of a host. Its Adjutant, Junius French, was killed there, and among the killed also was Wm. H. Johnston, Captain of Co. K, while the roster places the killed of privates and non-commissioned officers at about fifty-five, and eighty-nine wounded, and fifty-three among the captured
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
with a passport as a citizen of the United States issued by the American Minister, General Lewis Cass. In July, 1843, he entered the Virginia Military Institute as a cadet, and graduated in 1846. He was at once employed as assistant teacher of French. He was afterwards elected professor of French, and in the year 1859 he was also elected professor of military history and strategy, and of political economy, at .his alma mater. During the twelve years which elapsed between his graduation and French, and in the year 1859 he was also elected professor of military history and strategy, and of political economy, at .his alma mater. During the twelve years which elapsed between his graduation and this last promotion, Professor Colston was a diligent and successful student, in almost every department of human knowledge. He became master of many languages, and familiar with their literature. He was expert in mathematics and the physical sciences, especially those most useful in war. In April, 1861, by order of the Governor of Virginia he marched in command of the corps of cadets from Lexington to Richmond, where he, and his cadets were for sometime employed in drilling and setting up