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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 1 (search)
eldest brother, Richard Worsam Meade, had already, in the year 1826, been appointed a midshipman in the navy. In the meantime George remained at the school at Mount Hope, which he had entered December, 1829, to await the result of his mother's application for an appointment for him as cadet at the Military Academy. During this interval of waiting he seems to have pursued his studies with ardor. During a year he read, in Latin, Caesar's Commentaries and six of the orations of Cicero; in French, Telemaque and Charles XII of Sweden; in mathematics, Colburn's Arithmetic and Algebra, Walker's Geometry, Playfair's Euclid, and Trigonometry in Gummies' Surveying; Goodrich's History of the United States, Hart's Geography, and the greater part of Comstock's Chemistry and Natural Philosophy; which was doing very well for a lad of fifteen. The principal of the school pronounced him a boy of decided parts, of uncommon quickness of perception and readiness in acquiring knowledge; studious wi
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 2 (search)
well prints and notwithstanding they offer them for less than one-third of the price these people are obliged to give for French calicos, they cannot sell them, the answer always being they do not like those patterns. General Taylor has not recei, a long room, about the size, I should suppose, of the two in Fourth Street, is furnished with two mahogany pier-tables (French), with large mirrors over them. In each of the four corners are corner-pieces (tables), with vases filled with beautifulornaments, is on a table at the foot of the parlors, and the walls are hung all around with beautiful colored engravings (French), illustrating historical events in Spanish history. Then with curtains (narrow strips) of red and yellow, hung from gi, on the death of General Reynolds, commanded the First Corps, Army of the Potomac, at the battle of Gettysburg. William H. French, first lieutenant First Regiment of Artillery, afterward commanded the Federal forces at Harper's Ferry during the
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
operating directly under General Lee, moved down on the Federal position at Gaines's Mill, compelling the Federal troops to fall back to a position nearer the Chickahominy, when the opportune arrival of reinforcements, consisting of Meagher's and French's brigades, from the other side of the river, checked the enemy's further advance, restored order, and enabled the troops of General Porter to reform their lines, night putting an end to the fight. The loss on both sides had been very heavy, ter hard day's work. No sooner had the President left, than a Major General Follarde, of the Swiss army, comes down here, with orders to Hooker to show him every attention, and as he does not speak English, and I have some pretensions to speaking French, Hooker turned him over to me, and I have, to-day, been taking him all through my camps and showing him my command. He seems like all foreign officers of rank, intelligent and educated. He expressed himself delighted and wonder-struck with all
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
d to withdraw a portion of the force under General French, at Harper's Ferry, he was informed that ind returned to their commands. He ordered General French, at Harper's Ferry, to remove, under escor to being reinforced by him. This order to General French was, on July 1, when it was found that it ought to equal it, and with the arrival of General French's command, which should get up to-morrow, ar in the empty ammunition wagons. To General French, who had come from Harpers Ferry with 7,00yland, and Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, under General French and General Couch, respectively, which werintention, the following order was sent to General French at Frederick City in order to gain time inugh his chief of staff, at 7 A. M. sent to General French at Frederick City the following order: Jre the forces mentioned in your dispatch to Gen. French to be thrown to Harper's Ferry by rail as soon as possible, and shall so instruct Gen. French. It is of importance to get possession of South[2 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
s article was inspired by any of the friends of this officer, I am not prepared to say, and can hardly believe such to be the case. Headquarters army of the Potomac, September 8, 1863. Yesterday I reviewed the Third Corps, commanded by General French. The day was pretty hot, and I had to ride six miles to the review and back the same distance. I received recently a very handsome bouquet from two ladies in Sheboygan, Wisconsin; I send you the note accompanying it. Likewise a curious lett will be happy to attend any innocent amusement we may get up, he including among these horse races, of which he is very fond. I join with you in the regret expressed at the relief of Sykes. I tried very hard to retain Sykes, Newton, and even French, as division commanders, but without avail. I had very hard work to retain Sedgwick. As to Pleasanton, his being relieved was entirely the work of Grant and Stanton. I hear Butterfield has been swearing terribly against me. I shall go up day
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 15 (search)
ade's subsequent representation that he was not in condition to pursue was not true; that his army was abundantly able and in condition to make immediate pursuit, and, if necessary, to fight and crush Lee's disordered columns; that the 6th Corps was fresh and substantially intact; it had lost only 100 men, the 12th Corps had lost only 700 and had about 12,000 left, the 3d Corps had 6,000 men left and prayed to be permitted to pursue; the whole of the cavalry, 10,000 was intact and fresh. Gen. French had at Frederick 10,000 veterans in perfect condition, and Couch's great force was also at Meade's call. That, in a word, he had over 40,000 effective and ardent troops with which to pursue and destroy Lee's flying and demoralized army, but refused to use them and suffered the enemy to escape. It is upon the question of the issuance of the second order to retreat that Gen. Butterfield has been summoned. In the committee room it is understood that the origin of the effort made by Gen.
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
n of the garrison at Harper's Ferry, under General French—which was placed under my command by the gmy. Those orders I believe were executed; General French occupied Frederick and threw a force into emy were retiring, information was sent to General French, and he was directed to immediately seize which orders were not only executed, but General French, in advance of any instructions to that ef think, by General William Hays; the 3d by General French; the 5th by General Sykes; the 6th by Gene men; included in those were the 11,000 of General French, which I did not bring up, which would rede failure of the 3d corps, commanded by Major General French, to arrive at the Rapidan river within e other side. Question: What excuse did General French give for his slowness of movement? Answ attacking; and in the centre, in front of General French. Before these orders were issued, however changed my plans so far as to take two of General French's divisions, amounting to over 10,000 men,[5 more...]
capture of, Feb. 16, 1862, I, 246. Fort Henry, surrender of, Feb. 6, 1862, I, 245. Foster, Senator, II, 264. Frailey, I, 354. Frailey, Capt., II, 234. Franklin, Wm. B., I, 253, 256, 258-260, 275, 277, 281, 282, 284, 285, 293, 297, 328, 329, 334-337, 340, 341, 344-346, 350, 353, 358-362, 364, 365, 367, 382; II, 144, 213, 214, 216. Fredericksburg, battle of, Dec. 11-15, 1862, I, 337, 340, 359-362, 365, 367; II, 314. Fremont, John Charles, I, 231, 246, 258, 262, 352. French, Wm. H., I, 196, 288; II, 9, 13, 34, 103, 105, 113, 114, 119, 123, 147, 182, 185, 320, 362, 363, 365, 366, 373, 375. 387. Fresnel, I, 203. Furness, Frank, I, 376. G Gaines, Gen., I, 115. Gaines's Mill, battle of, June 27, 1862, I, 281. Gamble, Wm., II, 32, 47, 49, 52, 53. Ganard, Col., II, 143. Garcia, Gen., I, 97. Garland, Col., I, 134. Garnett, Mrs. Dr., II, 277, 278. Geary, John W., I, 196; II, 56, 64, 65, 67, 70, 73, 91, 93, 94, 98, 101, 102, 353, 354, 357.