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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: the corner --1835-1839; aet. 16-20 (search)
im his education and a start in life. Fifty years later Mr. Evangelides recalled those days in a letter to his sister Julia, and paid beautiful tribute to his benefactor. To all thtiie should be added a host of servants and retainers; and masters of various kinds, coming to teach music, languages, even dancing, for the children were taught to dance even if they never (or very seldom) were allowed to go to dances. Many of these teachers were foreign patriots: those were the days when one French 6migrg of rank dressed the hair of fashionable New York, while another made its salads, the two going their rounds before every festivity. Julia's musical education began early. Her first teacher was a French artist, so irritable that the terrified child could remember little that he taught her. He was succeeded in her tenth year by Mr. Boocock, a pupil of Cramer, to whom she always felt that she owed a great deal. Not only did he train her fingers so carefully that after eighty years t
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 6: South Boston 1844-1851; aet. 25-32 (search)
f mutton and the baby's cloak. This is one side of the picture; the other is different, indeed. Her girlhood had been shut in by locks and bars of Calvinistic piety; her friends and family were ready to laugh, to weep, to pray with her; they were not ready to think with her. It is true that surrounding this intimate circle was a wider one, where her mind found stimulus in certain directions. She studied German with Dr. Cogswell; she read Dante with Felice Foresti, the Italian patriot; French, Latin, music, she had them all. Her mind expanded, but her spiritual growth dates from her early visits to Boston. These visits had not been given wholly to gayety, even in the days when she wrote, after a ball: I have been through the burning, fiery furnace, and it is Sadrake, Me-sick, and Abed-no-go! The friends she made, both men and women, were people alive and awake, seeking new light, and finding it on every hand. Moreover, at her side was now one of the torch-bearers of humanity
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the peace crusade 1870-1872; aet. 51-53 (search)
after his own kind the sacred impress, not of Caesar, but of God. In the name of womanhood and of humanity, I earnestly ask that a general congress of women, without limit of nationality, may be appointed and held at some place deemed most convenient, and at the earliest period consistent with its objects, to promote the alliance of the different nationalities, the amicable settlement of international questions, the great and general interests of peace. The appeal was translated into French, Spanish, Italian, German, and Swedish, and sent broadcast far and wide. In October our mother wrote to Aaron Powell, president of the American Peace Society: The issue is one which will unite virtually the whole sex. God gave us, I think, the word to say, but it ought to be followed by immediate and organizing action.... Now, you, my dear sir, are bound, as a Friend and as an Advocate of Peace, to take especial interest in this matter, so I call upon you a little confidently, hoping that
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
o Switzerland was the Geneva Congress, called by Mrs. Josephine Butler to protest against the legalizing of vice in England. At the Congress to-day — spoke in French.... I spoke of the two sides, active and passive, of human nature, and of the tendency of the education given to women to exaggerate the passive side of their chao speak for five minutes. After some hesitation I said that I would try. Felt much annoyed at being asked so late. Went up to the platform and did pretty well in French. The audience applauded, laughing a little at some points. In fact, my little speech was a decided success with the Frenchspeaking part of the audience. Two orss of Germany. September 24. A conference of Swiss and English women at 11 A. M. A sister of John Stuart Mill spoke, like the other English ladies, in very bad French. Nous femmes said she repeatedly. She seemed a good woman, but travelled far from the subject of the meeting, which was the work to be done to carry out what th
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: a Roman winter--1878-1879; aet. 59-60 (search)
rbles gathered in the Museum. Have been writing something about these. To ball at the palace in my usual sober rig, black velvet and so forth. Queen very gracious to us.... Home by three in the morning. February 12. At ten in the morning came a committee of Cretan officers of the late insurrection, presenting a letter through Mr. Rainieri, himself a Cretan, expressing the gratitude of the Cretans to dear Papa for his efforts in their behalf. .... Mr. Rainieri made a suitable address in French--to which I replied in the same tongue. Coffee and cordial were served. The occasion was of great interest. . . In the afternoon spoke at Mrs. Felton's of the Advancement of Women as promoted by association. An American dinner of perhaps forty, nearly all women, Greek, but understanding English. A good occasion. To party at Madame Schliemann's. February 15. Miserable with a cold. A confused day in which nothing seemed to go right. Kept losing sight of papers and other things. Fel
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
s — another little scrap, too, about the seven devils that Christianity can cast out. General Walker in the afternoon and the Harlands to dinner. They left London to join Mrs. Terry at Schwalbach, lingering for a little on the way in Holland and Belgium. July 27. The Hague. To see Mesdag and his pictures. Found Mesdag a hale man of perhaps fifty years--perhaps less; a fine house, and, besides his own paintings of which we saw a number, a wonderful collection of pictures, mostly modern French, Troyon, Corot, Rousseau, Daubigny. Some good things by a Roman artist, Mancini, whom Mesdag praised highly -he is very poor, but has some excellent qualities. A picture of a little girl reclining on a pillow with a few flowers in her hand, pleased me very much — he also praised it. Much fine tapestry, china, etc., etc. He was gruffly pleasant and hospitable. July 28. Antwerp. Visited Cathedral and Musee. Saw my picture, Rubens's Elevation of the Cross, but felt that my eyesight has d
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 10: the last Roman winter 1897-1898; aet. 78 (search)
g Irish lad of fourteen saved Draper's life by running to Bull Plain for aid. April 26. Lunch at Daisy Chanler's, to meet Mrs. Sanford, of Hamilton, Canada, who is here in the interests of the International Council of Women. She seems a nice, whole-souled woman.... I have promised to preside at a meeting, called at Daisy's rooms for Thursday, to carry forward such measures as we can and to introduce Mrs. Sanford and interpret for her. April 27. Devoted the forenoon to a composition in French, setting forth the objects of the meeting.... April 28. Went carefully over my French address. In the afternoon attended the meeting at Daisy's where I presided. This was the first time the Italian women had taken part in the International Council. April 30. To Contessa di Taverna at Palazzo Gabrielli, where I met the little knot of newly elected officers of the Council of Italian Women that is to be. Read them my report of our first meeting — they chattered a great deal. Mrs. Sa
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
ratification to-day. Mrs. Fiske Warren had invited us to afternoon tea and to hear Coquelin deliver some monologues. I bethought me of my poem entitled After Hearing Coquelin. Maud wrote to ask Mrs. Warren whether she would like to have me read it and she assented. I procured a fresh copy of the volume in which it is published, and took it with me to this party, which was large and very representative of Boston's most recognized people. Miss Shedlock first made a charming recitation in French, which she speaks perfectly. Then Coquelin gave three delightful monologues. The company then broke up for tea and I thought my chance was lost, but after a while order was restored. M. Coquelin was placed where I could see him, and I read the poem as well as I could. He seemed much touched with the homage, and I gave him the book. People in general were pleased with the poem and I was very glad and thankful for so pleasant an experience. Learned with joy of the birth of a son to my de
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord 1908-1910; aet. 89-91 (search)
orgot this pleasure, nor the warm kindness of the giver. One day Mr. Abel Lefranc, the French lecturer of the year at Harvard, came to lunch with her. He apologized for only being able to stay for the luncheon hour, owing to a press of engagements and work that had grown overpowering. He stayed for two hours and a half after luncheon was over, and during all that time the flow of poignant, brilliant talk, a deux, held the third in the little company absorbed. She was entirely at home in French, and the Frenchman talked over the problems of his country as if to a compatriot. A few days afterwards a Baptist minister from Texas, a powerfully built and handsome man, came to wait on her. He also stayed two hours: and we heard his Amen! and Bless the Lord for that! and her gentler Bless the Lord, indeed, my brother! as their voices, fervent and grave, mingled in talk. She never tried to be interested in people. She was interested, with every fibre of her being. Little househo
Index Abbott, J., I, 214, 215; II, 99. Abdin Palace, II, 35, 36. Abdul Hamid II, II, 42. Abdul Hassan, mosque of, II, 36. Aberdeen, Countess of, II, 165, 166. Aberdeen, J. C. H. Gordon, Earl of, II, 165. Abolitionists, I, 177, 305; II, 171. Academy of Fine Arts, French, II, 23. Acroceraunian Mountains, I, 272. Acropolis, II, 43. Adamowski, Timothee, II, 55, 58. Adams, Charles Follen, II, 270, 273; verse by, II, 335. Adams, Mrs. C. F., I, 266. Adams, John, I, 4. Adams, John Quincy, II, 312. Adams, Nehemiah, I, 168. Advertiser, Boston, II, 195, 222. Aegina, I, 73. Aeschylus, II, 130, 282, 348, 372. Agassiz, Alexander, II, 50. Agassiz, Elizabeth Cary, I, 124, 345, 361; II, 228, 287, 292. Agassiz, Louis, I, 124, 151, 251, 345; II, 150, 158. Aide, Hamilton, II, 251. Airlie, Lady, II, 254. Alabama, II, 108. Albania, I, 272. Albany, I, 342. Albert of Savoy, II, 303. Albert Victor, II, 9. Albinola, Sig