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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for John R. French or search for John R. French in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
mbrace these new-fangled notions as abolitionists—but then one fanaticism leads to another, and Cf. ante, 2.423. they are getting to be mono-maniacs, as the Reverend brother Punchard called us, on every subject. George Punchard. Rogers's light-heartedness was manifested under difficulties. In January the circulation of the Herald of Freedom had dwindled to some 900, and, the publisher being unable to sustain it, the New Hampshire Society had to take the paper on their hands again. J. R. French and two other boys, as Quincy wrote to Collins, print it for nothing, asking only board and clothes. Ms. Jan. 30, 1841. In July, a frank review of the struggles of paper and editor, made Herald of Freedom, 7.82, Lib. 11.118. by Rogers in his own columns, showed that very little of his salary had reached him, that much was due him, and that he forgave much. On Sept. 7, 1842, he writes to H. C. Wright (Ms.): To-morrow I must go to my native village to hunt up some means of support, hav
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
is one, though Rogers and French wish to wink it out of sight—have entered J. R. French. into an arrangement with the Executive Committee to supply the largest poss Your influence over him is greater than that of any other, I think, except J. R. French. Still, he might print the Herald if he had any manhood. 'Tis marvellous t, 1844, E. Quincy to R. D. Webb). Meantime, his prospective son-in-law, John R. French, had set up a baseless claim to the ownership of the Herald, which Rogers end called them the fatal shot in the side of our struggling bark. Lib. 14.191. French, on his part, defying the Board, Lib. 14.186. took his appeal to the Society ato terminate the publishing of the Herald of Freedom. Poor John has had his J. R. French. hands full to worry along with it thus far. This will cripple him. His supperely this. Foster got a notion the S. S. Foster. publisher of the paper, John R. French, was receiving too many donations, and himself too few—which [last was] tru