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, directed by Capt. Hazard, Fourth artillery. I also posted the brigade of General French and one regiment of Howard's brigade in my front line. The remaining threeed on both flanks by battalions of infantry deployed in line of battle. Generals French and Howard now opened upon them a steady and well-directed fire from theirprisoners and deserters, they must have been badly beaten. Generals Howard and French could not have been excelled in their dispositions of the different forces undecularly mention the conduct and coolness of Capt. Fiske, Lieut. Plumer, and Lieut. French, of General French's staff; also of Capt. Sewall, Lieuts. Howard, Scott, anGeneral French's staff; also of Capt. Sewall, Lieuts. Howard, Scott, and Milles, of General Howard's staff. Capts. Hazard and Pettit, of the artillery, also deserve particular mention for the commendable manner in which they served the orest directly in front, where they halted and taunted our line to advance. Gen. French, whose brigade was in front, declined the invitation, and the rebels rushed
ojecting from a window in the second story of that building, fronting on Esplanade street, directly under, as it were, the flag-staff that had borne the colors in question. In the mean time the unfortunate man was awaiting his fate in the Custom-House. On the evening of the fifth instant, three days ago, the order of execution was read to him by Deputy Provost-Marshal Stafford, he being charged with carrying into effect the details of the sentence in consequence of the illness of Provost-Marshal French. The document reads as follows: headquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, June 5. special order no 70. William B. Mumford, a citizen of New-Orleans, having been convicted before the military commission of treason and an overt act thereof in tearing down the United States flag from a public building of the United States, for the purpose of inciting other evil-minded persons to further resistance to the laws and arms of the United States, after said flag was placed
laws or the administration of them, or his consul wearying the authorities with verbose protests, but simply to go home--stay not on the order of his going, but go at once. Such a person came here without our invitation, he will be parted with without our regrets. But he must not have committed crimes against our laws and then expect to be allowed to go home to escape the punishment of those crimes. I must beg, gentlemen, that no more argumentative protests against my orders be sent to me by you as a body. If any consul has anything to offer for my consideration, he will easily learn the proper mode of presenting it. It is no part of your duties or your rights. I have, gentlemen, the honor to be your ob't servant, Benj. F. Butler, Major-General Commanding. Messrs. Ch. Mejan, French Consul; Juan Callejon, Consul de Espana; Jos. Deynoodt, Consul of Belgium; M. W. Benachi, Greek Consul; Joseph Lanata, Consul of Italy; B. Teryaghi, vice-Consul; Ad. Piaget, Swiss Consul.
s, and who had failed to return. They made a rush for the bridge, followed by some of the troops, but before they reached the last hospital near the end of the bridge, they were speedily and summarily checked. About seven o'clock, Meagher's and French's brigades crossed the bridge, and advanced on the double-quick up the hill, forming in line of battle beyond the hospital, and swooping up the stragglers with a round turn. Griffin's and Martin's batteries likewise did splendid services in checut it was useless, Martin's fierce leaden rain being too terrible to withstand. The advance of the fresh troops having checked the enemy, and night coming on, the conflict ceased, and both parties quietly lay on their arms. The brigades of Gens. French and Meagher did not get into action. They formed in the rear of our broken columns, and did excellent service in checking the flight of many panic-stricken stragglers and demoralized troops. The enemy quickly perceived the arrival of those fr
sword, called upon his men for one more charge. The men sprang forward, with three roaring cheers, and drove back the advancing foe. At this time the gallant Capt. French, of company K, Fourteenth Maine, received his terrible wound. The charge was made in presence of Gen. Williams, who complimented the men very highly. Capt. FCapt. French was placed on board the unfortunate steamer Whiteman, and was lost when she went down. His name deserves special mention. The conduct of the officers and men of the several batteries was every thing that could be looked for by the Commanding General. The various batteries were very much reduced by sickness and deaths, andd, which lost heavily in killed and wounded. Major Bickmore and Adjutant J. H. Metcalfe, of the Fourteenth Maine, wounded while nobly discharging their duty. Capt. French, company K, Fourteenth Maine, who was wounded while leading on his men to one of the finest charges of the battle. It is sorrowful, indeed, to add, that by th
ates, Morrissy, lost forefinger of right hand; French, back, slight; Moore, back, slight. Company Division, Ninth Army Corps. Report of General French. headquarters French's division, SumnFrench's division, Sumner's corps, camp on battle-field, near Sharpsburgh, Md., September 21, 1862. Lieut.-Colonel Taylor, ever surpassed. My staff, Lieuts. Plume and French, aids-decamp, who have been through every battd are detailed in the subordinate reports. W. H. French, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Division. Repor Kimball. headquarters Kimball's brigade, French's division, Sumner's corps, army of the Potomaig.-General Commanding First Brigade. To Brig.-Gen. French, Commanding Division. Report of Lieun with the other regiments of your brigade and French's division, we maintained, from nine o'clock A General Kimball, Commanding First Brigade General French's Division: sir: I report as follows: Oer sent forward two divisions — Richardson and French--on the left. Sedgwick, moving in column of d[1 more...]
hand, slightly; Wm. Daniels, seriously; Albert Fales, jaw, slightly; Edward Hogan; George Hunt, arm; John C. Johnston, severely and missing; David F. Mack, hand, very slight; Samuel A. Matthews, thigh; John Newcomb, hip; Michael O'Brien, both legs seriously, leg since amputated; Michael O'Donnell, and Joseph Stone. Missing: Capt. S. M. Quincy. Company F--Wounded: Lieut. T. R. Robeson, shot through wrist; Corp. Marsh, breast, not serious; privates, Morrissy, lost forefinger of right hand; French, back, slight; Moore, back, slight. Company G--Killed : Captain Richard Cary, Sergt. Wm. Andrews, privates, H. C. Hoxsey, H. O. Howard, Francis Hatch. Wounded: First Sergeant R. S. Williston, hand and leg seriously, leg since amputated; Sergt. M. P. Richardson, leg; Sergt. T. F. Page, hand and thigh, slightly; Corp. C. H. Hazelton, finger; privates, John Callanan, thigh; George J. Coles, knee; George R. Dobbins, finger; Martin Greene, thigh; A. L. Madden, neck; Daniel McCrohan, shoulder
surrendered every thing, guns, ordnance and commissary stores, etc. The number of the enemy is variously estimated at from seven to twelve thousand, and the negroes from fifteen hundred to two thousand. Of our losses we are not apprised, but judge from reports that Gen. Jackson's column suffered pretty heavily. In Walker's division we had five killed, three of these by the accidental explosion of a shell. Among the killed in this division, we have heard the name of Lieut. Robertson, of French's battery. later.--Since the above was written we have received the following additional particulars, contained in a letter to Gov. Letcher from Col. Francis H. Smith: Winchester, September 16. After the advance of our army to Frederick, and the issuing of the admirable proclamation to the people of Maryland by Lee, a movement took place with our troops, seemingly in the direction of Pennsylvania, but really for an important movement into Virginia. After sending a portion of his troo
econd Division, Ninth Army Corps. Report of General French. headquarters French's division, Sumner's French's division, Sumner's corps, camp on battle-field, near Sharpsburgh, Md., September 21, 1862. Lieut.-Colonel Taylor, Chief of Staff,age never surpassed. My staff, Lieuts. Plume and French, aids-decamp, who have been through every battle, waptured are detailed in the subordinate reports. W. H. French, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Division. Report of Bneral Kimball. headquarters Kimball's brigade, French's division, Sumner's corps, army of the Potomac, onll, Brig.-General Commanding First Brigade. To Brig.-Gen. French, Commanding Division. Report of Lieut.-Colection with the other regiments of your brigade and French's division, we maintained, from nine o'clock A. M. r 19. General Kimball, Commanding First Brigade General French's Division: sir: I report as follows: On the Sumner sent forward two divisions — Richardson and French--on the left. Sedgwick, moving in column of divisi