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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 25 3 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 9 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 3 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Winsor B. French or search for Winsor B. French in all documents.

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e. Second Vermont, Major Enoch E. Johnson. Third and Fourth Vermont, Major Horace W. Floyd. Fifth Vermont, Captain Addison Brown, Jr. Sixth Vermont, Captain Martin W. Davis. Eleventh Vermont (First Heavy Artillery), Major Aldace F. Walker. Third brigade: Brigadier-General Daniel D. Bidwell. Seventh Maine, Major Stephen C. Fletcher. Forty-third New York, Major Charles A. Milliken. Forty-ninth New York (battalion), Lieutenant-Colonel Erastus D. Holt. Seventy-seventh New York, Lieutenant-Colonel Winsor B. French. One Hundred and Twenty-second New York, Major Jabez M. Brower. Sixty-first Pennsylvania (battalion) (1), Captain Charles S. Greene. Sixty-first Pennsylvania (battalion) (2), Captain David J. Taylor. Third division: Brigadier-General James B. Ricketts. first brigade: Colonel William Emerson. Fourteenth New Jersey (1), Major Peter Vredenburgh. Fourteenth New Jersey (2), Captain Jacob J. Janeway. One Hundred and Sixth New York, Captain Peter Robertson. One Hundred and Fifty
talion) (1), Captain Edwin R. Kinney. Sixth Vermont (battalion) (2), Captain Wm. J. Sperry. Eleventh Vermont (First Heavy Artillery), Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Hunsdon. Third brigade: (1) Brigadier-General Daniel D. Bidwell. (2) Lieutenant-Colonel Winsor B. French. First Maine (Veteran), Major Stephen C. Fletcher. Forty-third New York (battalion), Major Charles A. Milliken. Forty-ninth New York (battalion), Lieutenant-Colonel Erastus D. Holt. Seventy-seventh New York, Lieutenant-Colonel WinLieutenant-Colonel Winsor B. French. One Hundred and Twenty-second New York (1), Lieutenant-Colonel Augustus W. Dwight. One Hundred and Twenty-second New York (2), Major Jabez M. Brower. Sixty-first Pennsylvania (battalion), Captain David J. Taylor. Third division. Colonel J. Warren Keifer. first brigade: Colonel William Emerson. Fourteenth New Jersey, Captain Jacob J. Janeway. One Hundred and Sixth New York (1), Captain Alvah W. Briggs. One Hundred and Sixth New York (2), Captain Peter Robertson. One Hundred
p resembling those of the French), leveled their pieces at me. They were greatly excited, so much so, indeed, that I thought my hour had come, for they could not understand English, and I could not speak German, and dare not utter explanations in French. Fortunately a few disconnected German words came to me in the emergency. With these I managed to delay my execution, and one of the party ventured to come up to examine the suspect more closely. The first thing he did was to take off my cap, and looking it over carefully, his eyes rested on the three stars above the visor, and, pointing to them, he emphatically pronounced me French. Then of course they all became excited again, more so than before, even, for they thought I was trying to practice a ruse, and I question whether I should have lived to recount the adventure had not an officer belonging to the King's headquarters been passing by just then, when, hearing the threatenings and imprecations, he rode up to learn the cause o
tamboul — about 6,000-comprising infantry, cavalry, and artillery. They were as fine looking a body of soldiers as I ever saw-well armed and well clothed, the men all large and of sturdy appearance. After the review we attended a grand military dinner given by the Grand Vizier. At the hour set for this banquet we presented ourselves at the palace of the Grand Vizier, and being ushered into a large drawing-room, found already assembled there the guests invited to meet us. Some few spoke French, and with these we managed to exchange an occasional remark; but as the greater number stood about in silence, the affair, thus far, was undeniably a little stiff. Just before the dinner was announced, all the Turkish officers went into an adjoining room, and turning their faces to the east, prostrated themselves to the floor in prayer. Then we were all conducted to a large salon, where each being provided with a silver ewer and basin, a little ball of highly perfumed soap and a napkin, se