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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 56 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 46 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Philip Freneau or search for Philip Freneau in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
him by one of his friends: Siste, Viator, Here lies one Whose life was whim, whose soul was pun, And if you go too near his hearse, He'll joke you both in prose and verse. These few specimens show, if they show nothing more, that other spirits than Cotton Mather and Jonathan Edwards were alive in America in the eighteenth century. The Revolution produced its humour chiefly in the form of political satire; the principal names are Francis Hopkinson, John Trumbull, Joel Barlow, Philip Freneau. For these four poets see Book I, Chap. IX. The first two were perhaps most important in this connection. Hopkinson's Battle of the Kegs was as good for the American cause as the winning of a real battle. In the grim year of 1778, this poem went into every American camp, cheered the patriots, and provoked hearty laughter at the awkwardness and stupidity of the enemy. And Trumbull in McFingal produced a Hudibrastic epic whose anger and irresistible logic reflected ingeniously the t
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 21: Newspapers, 1775-1860 (search)
found in the columns of dingy newspapers, from the vivid and popular satires and narratives of Freneau See Book I, Chap. IX. to the saddest effusions of the most commonplace schoolmaster. Thethe exclusion of the people. To offset the influence of this, Jefferson and Madison induced Philip Freneau, who had been editing The daily Advertiser in New York, to set up a half weekly, to go through the states and furnish a Whig vehicle of intelligence. Freneau's National Gazette, which first appeared 31 October, 1791, soon became the most outspoken critic of the administration of Adams, Hamilton, and Washington, and an ardent advocate of the French Revolution. Fenno and Freneau, in The Gazette of the United States and The national Gazette, at once came to grips, and the campaign of p 1801 wrote: If we had been blessed with common sense, we should not have been overthrown by Philip Freneau, Duane, Callender, Cooper, and Lyon, or their great patron and protector. A group of foreig
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 23: writers of familiar verse (search)
was to be discovered here and there in towns where the social organization had advanced beyond its elementary stages. Benjamin Franklin, a pioneer in so many different departments of human endeavour, seems to have been the earliest American to adventure himself among the difficulties of this lighter poetry, so closely akin to prose in its directness and in its seeming lack of effort; and perhaps his lines on Paper could open an American selection of familiar verse only by favouritism. Philip Freneau See Book I, Chap. IX. essayed it more than once; so did Royall Tyler, Ibid. our first writer of comedy; so did John Quincy Adams See Book II, Chap. XV. and James Kirke Paulding See Book II, Chap. V. and Washington Irving, See Book II, Chap. IV.—prose men all of them, dropping into rhyme only occasionally, and only when the spirit moved them. And it is a significant fact, supported by a host of examples in both branches of English literature, British and American, that i
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
jamin, 148, 214, 215, 241 Franklin Evans, 262 Fredericksburg, 281 Freedom and War, 216 Freedom Wheeler's controversy with Providence, 373 Free Joe and other Georgian sketches, 352 n. Free Joe and the rest of the world, 352 n. Freeman, James, 206, 207 Freeman, Mary E. Wilkins, 360, 364, 382, 390 Freeman's journal, the, 299 Free press (Detroit), 182 Free press (Newburyport), The, 44 Freiligrath, P., 271 Fremont, John C., 283 French, Alice, 379, 388, 390 Freneau, Philip, 150, 177, 180, 181, 241 Friendship's Offering, 174 Froissart, 124, 332 Front Yard, the, 382 Frost, Rev., Barzillai, 5 Frost, John, 404 Frothingham, Octavius Brooks, 197 Froude, J. H., 137 Fruin, Professor, 138, 139, 140, 141 Fry, William H., 192 Fuller, Margaret, 37, 165, 192 Fulton, M. G., 304 Furness, Horace Howard, 197 Furness, William Henry, 197, 211 Future of the American negro, the, 325 Gabriel Conroy, 380, 387 Gachard, L. P., 138 Gales, 181