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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 36 0 Browse Search
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efusal. After due consideration, and after preparing a letter to the English Secretary for the Colonies, in justification of their proceedings, the House refused to rescind, by a vote of ninety-two against seventeen. This decision was communicated to the Governor, who immediately executed his threat and dissolved the House. It was thus made known that the vital right of representation was to be enjoyed only on the condition of a servile compliance with an arbitrary royal instruction. Frothingham's Rise of the Republic, p. 221. It was soon afterwards reported that three regiments of soldiers were to be stationed in Boston, to enforce submission to the government. The inhabitants thereupon assembled in town meeting, and sent a message to the Governor, inquiring if he expected such a military force, and requesting him to summon a new General Court. On his refusal, the town Resolved, that as the people labor under many grievances, and as the Governor has declared himself unable, at
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
time and in this immediate vicinity. Rev. Thomas Shepard, grandson of the first pastor of this church, was ordained at Charlestown, May 5, 1680. Mr. Shepard was ordained by Mr. Sherman of Watertown, and received the right hand of fellowship from President Oakes. He preached his own Ordination Sermon, and took his text from Hebrews, XIII. 20, That great Shepherd of the sheep. Another sermon was preached on this occasion, from Ezekiel XXXIII. 7, Son of man, I have set thee a watchman. Frothingham's History of Charlestown, p. 192. Rev. Benjamin Estabrook was ordained at Lexington, Oct. 21, 1696, exactly five weeks before the ordination of Mr. Brattle. Judge Sewall describes the exercises thus: A church is gathered at Cambridge North Farms. No relations made, but a covenant signed and voted by ten brethren, dismissed from the churches of Cambridge, Watertown, Woburn, Concord, for this work. Being declared to be a church, they chose Mr. Benjamin Estabrooks their pastor, who had mad
t of the Revolutionary War have been so fully related in Frothingham's History of the Siege of Boston, that I may properly foalem, 1; Stow; Sudbury, 2; Watertown, 1; Woburn, 2. See Frothingham's Siege of Boston, pp. 80, 81. Certainly some other townsix missing,— the most of which were taken prisoners. Frothingham's Siege of Boston, p. 82. Of the provincials the loss was converted into barracks for the Connecticut troops. Frothingham's Hist. Siege of Boston, p. 132. It had previously beenthat day have been particularly and vividly described in Frothingham's History of the Siege of Boston. I shall not repeat thonels Glover, Frye, Bridge, Woodbridge, and Sargeant. Frothingham's Siege of Boston, pp. 219, 220. According to a List of Gen. Putnam's Headquarters were in the Inman house. Frothingham says that during the next winter the troops were accommoJames Frost, Jr. Neptune Frost. Seth Frost. Charles Frothingham William Frothingham Robert Fulton. William
, and had Eunice, b. 16 Aug. 1742, m. John Ranslow Sigourney 8 Nov. 1764; Nathaniel, b. 10 Ap. 1747, grad. H. C. 1767. and was a physician at New Market, N. H., where he d. in Dec. 1828; Samuel, b. 26 Sept. 1753. Na-Thaniel the f. was a farmer, and d. 28 Mar. 1789, a. 86; his w. Deborah d. 31 Mar. 1789, a. 72; and they were buried in one grave. 13. John, s. of Thomas (11), m. Mary Jackson of Newton (pub. 6 Mar. 1761) and had Mary, bap. 29 Dec. 1761; Lydia, bap. 11 Dec. 1763, m. Charles Frothingham 27 Sept. 1786; Sarah, bap. 29 Dec. 1765, m. Andrew Lopez 19 Nov. 1788; Phebe, bap. 1 Nov. 1767; John, b. 10 Sept. 1769, prob. d. Ap. 1810; Tabitha, b. 9 Ap. 1771; Hannah, b. 20 Ap. 1773; Elizabeth, b. 10 Mar. 1775, d. 6 Nov. 1776; Elizabeth, b. 26 Aug. 1778; Rebecca, b. 16 Aug. 1780, d. unm. 7 Nov. 1854; Thomas, b. 20 May 1783, d. in Boston 20 Jan. 1876. John the f. was a tailor, and res. near the southeasterly corner of the old Burial-ground, where the church of the First Parish n
, and had Eunice, b. 16 Aug. 1742, m. John Ranslow Sigourney 8 Nov. 1764; Nathaniel, b. 10 Ap. 1747, grad. H. C. 1767. and was a physician at New Market, N. H., where he d. in Dec. 1828; Samuel, b. 26 Sept. 1753. Na-Thaniel the f. was a farmer, and d. 28 Mar. 1789, a. 86; his w. Deborah d. 31 Mar. 1789, a. 72; and they were buried in one grave. 13. John, s. of Thomas (11), m. Mary Jackson of Newton (pub. 6 Mar. 1761) and had Mary, bap. 29 Dec. 1761; Lydia, bap. 11 Dec. 1763, m. Charles Frothingham 27 Sept. 1786; Sarah, bap. 29 Dec. 1765, m. Andrew Lopez 19 Nov. 1788; Phebe, bap. 1 Nov. 1767; John, b. 10 Sept. 1769, prob. d. Ap. 1810; Tabitha, b. 9 Ap. 1771; Hannah, b. 20 Ap. 1773; Elizabeth, b. 10 Mar. 1775, d. 6 Nov. 1776; Elizabeth, b. 26 Aug. 1778; Rebecca, b. 16 Aug. 1780, d. unm. 7 Nov. 1854; Thomas, b. 20 May 1783, d. in Boston 20 Jan. 1876. John the f. was a tailor, and res. near the southeasterly corner of the old Burial-ground, where the church of the First Parish n
Fisman, 75. Fitch, 288, 9. Fitzpatrick, 329. Flagg, 76. Fletcher, 317. Flint, 289,92, 306, 84. Fobes, 336. Foote, 310. Forbes, 312. Foster, 111, 83, 4, 296, 310, 76. Fowle, 220. Fownell, 59. Fox, 58, 75, 263, 9, 83, 353, 4. Foxcroft, 109, 10, 16, 27, 204, 57, 86, 92, 336, 75, 403, 17, 25. Foy, 76. Francis, 59, 76, 186, 312, 63. French, 35, 58, 9, 62, 254, 5, 7. Frost, 34, 5, 59, 68, 75, 6, 143, 80, 254-8, 69, 73, 297, 353, 407, 15. Frothingham, 408, 11,17, 18, 23. Frye, 405, 6, 23. Fuller, 80, 1, 208, 426. Fultz, 339. Gage, 65, 154, 6-8, 162. Gale, 208. Gallop, 170. Gamage, 407. Gannett, 176, 94, 219, 311, 12, 14. Gardner, 5, 142-4, 54, 9, 292, 5, 407, 8, 11, 13, 18-21, 5, 8. Gates, 263. Gay, 173. Gearner, 33. Gedney, 111, 15. Genings, 355. George, 110. George III., 144. Gerrish, 288, 423. Gerry, 168, 93, 203, 6. Gibbons, 383, 4. Gibbs, 289. Gibson, 33, 59, 75, 102
an. Winthrop. Goddard, 560, 1. Brown. Cooper. Dickson. Doyley. Frost. Frothingham. Fullerton. Gove. Hawes. Johnson. Kent. Kidder. Miles. Norton. Oldf. Kidder, 596, 7. Bartlett. Bowman. Brown. Cooper. Crosby. Danforth. Frothingham. Goddard. Griggs. Hunnewell Hyde. Jackson. Kettle. Lopez. Moore. P Hastings. Meriam, 609. Ball. Cooper. Stone. Miller, 609, 10. Coolidge. Frothingham. Smith. Tapley. Minot, 610. Champney. Corlett. Mirick, 610. Trowbridge. wall. Sweetser. Waite. Oldham, 617. Brown. Chadwick. Dana. Fessenden. Frothingham. Gates. Parks. Reed. Wood. Oliver, 618-20. Angier. Belcher. Bradish. Fessenden. Fillebrown. Fiske. Fitch. Fosdick. Foster. Freeman. Frost. Frothingham. Gamage. Gay. Gibson. Goddard. Goodnow. Gorham. Gove. Haley. Hall.