hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 4 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 10 results in 4 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 2: the Worcester period (search)
lses, some leading people in Sam's parish. Then he invited Brownlee Brown, who wrote the fine article in the last Atlantic, The ideal tendency, to come down from Newburg and dine with me, but he did not appear. I spent part of a day with Octavius Frothingham at Jersey City. Then I moused about New York a good deal and saw various things I wished to see. I saw nothing so good, however, as a scene Frothingham reported to me, between two little street-sweeping boys, whom he passed at dusk the niFrothingham reported to me, between two little street-sweeping boys, whom he passed at dusk the night before, it being terribly rainy and muddy. Come, Bill, said one, ain't it about time to close up for the night? Bill consented, and F. lingered to see in what the process of closing up consisted. It consisted in the two little wretches deliberately hoeing back over the crossing all the mud they had cleared off, so as to give a fair chance for next day's operations My lecture stirred them up a good deal in Brooklyn and brought special appeals and insults to Sam from his flock (he being
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the peace crusade 1870-1872; aet. 51-53 (search)
g for the purpose of considering and arranging the steps necessary to be taken for calling a World's Congress of Women in behalf of International Peace would be held in Union League Hall, Madison Avenue and Twentysixth Street, New York, on Friday, December 23. The announcement, which sets forth the need for and objects of such a congress, is signed by Julia Ward Howe, William Cullen Bryant, and Mary F. Davis. The meeting was an important one: there were addresses by Lucretia Mott, Octavius Frothingham, and Alfred Love, the Peace prophet of Philadelphia; letters from John Stuart Mill, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and William Howard Furness, who adjures peacelovers to labor for the establishment of a Supreme Court to which all differences between nations shall be referred for settlement. Mrs. Howe made the opening address, from which we quote these words:-- So I repeat my call and cry to women. Let it pierce through dirt and rags — let it pierce through velvet and cashmere. It is
a C., I, 18, 25, 26, 27, 31, 42, 103, 150, 230; II, 319. Francis, J. W., I, 18, 19, 26, 27, 36, 42, 57, 114, 150; II, 251. Francis, V. M., II, 362. Franco-Prussian War, I, 300; I, 13, 20. Franklin, Benjamin, I, 6. Fredericksburg, I, 192. Free Religious Club, see Radical Club. Freeman, Edward, I, 95, 134. Freeman, Mrs., Edward, I, 95, 134. Fremdenblatt, II, 19. French Revolution, I, 12. Fries, Wulf, I, 145. From the Oak to the Olive, I, 265, 269. Frothingham, Octavius, I, 304. Froude, J. A., I, 86. Fuller, Margaret, I, 69, 72, 87, 346; I, 76, 84, 85, 86, 142; II, 404, 405. Furness, W. H., I, 304. Gainsborough, Lady, nx, 6. Gallup, Charles, II, 310. Galveston, II, 279. Gambetta, Leon, II, 25. Garcia method, I, 43. Gardiner, I, 122, 163, 194, 337. Gardiner, J. H., II, 267. Gardner, Mrs., Jack, I, 70, 82, 150, 182, 192. Garfield, J. A., II, 69. Garibaldi, Giuseppe, II, 242. Garrett, Thomas, I, 151. Garriso
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1837. (search)
husetts,— at Southington and East Brooklyn, Connecticut,—and at Rochester, New York. Most of the peculiarities which have been described were so very obvious that, however wide might be the discrepancies of judgment among comparative strangers, there could not be much variation in the estimates made of James Richardson by those who knew him well. I cannot refrain from matching my own sketch of him by some extracts from an admirable analysis of his character from the skilful pen of Octavius Frothingham, who was also a friend of many years' standing. The first sentence, especially, conveys so felicitous a statement, that it might almost take the place of all which I have said. I have just an impression of him as a wreath of fire-mist which seemed every moment to be on the point of becoming a star, but which never did, though it showed signs of solidity here and there, in spots of special effulgence. I remember him as all diffusiveness, loving everybody he knew, and wishing it