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ssion of the hill. The Twenty-fourth Kentucky were unable to hold the ground. The One Hundred and Third Ohio and Sixty-fifth Illinois, sent to reenforce them, finally drove the enemy from the coveted position. Our loss in this affair was sixty killed and wounded. Matters are now assuming an interesting outlook. Old scout Reynolds came in this evening from Kingston, bringing confirmation of Bragg's defeat and the assurance of present aid from Grant. Sherman is said to be at Cleveland, Generals Fry and Willcox at Bean's Station, and considerable force at Wytheville — from all of which, if true, Longstreet's position will not prove to be an easy one. His chief care will now be to effect his escape by the North-Carolina mountains as the only road left open to him. Orders by General Burnside. headquarters army of the Ohio, Knoxville, Tenn., Nov. 25, 1863. General field orders, No. 32. In accordance with the proclamation of the President of the United States, Thursday, t
orest. Many of the fields, however, were overgrown with weeds, showing where the slaves had run away before the spring-work was done. The houses were generally closed, and a Sabbath silence brooded over the land. It was evidently one of the richest agricultural regions in the State, and even now was filled with plenty. But next year, with their slaves all gone, these wealthy planters must starve, or else put their own shoulders to the wheel. Some time after dark we came in sight of Captain Fry's picket-fires, and half an hour subsequently entered Currituck, having marched sixteen miles in five hours. The weather was exceedingly cold, and camp-fires were speedily blazing about the three houses constituting the village. The next day Colonel Draper obtained permission from the General to attempt the capture of Captain Grandy's guerrilla camp, concerning the location of which he had obtained reliable information. Taking with him one hundred and sixty men, he proceeded back on t