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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 35 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 29 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 6 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 21 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 13 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 12 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for James B. Fry or search for James B. Fry in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 6 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Preface. (search)
cordial cooperation as writers, and assistance as interested actors, of the soldiers of both sides; in these respects the aid rendered by veterans, from the highest rank to the lowest, has been unstinted, and would be deserving of particular mention if such were possible within the bounds of an ordinary preface. Nearly every writer in the work, and very many others whose names do not appear, have been willing sources of suggestion and information. Special aid has been received from General James B. Fry, from the late Colonel Robert N. Scott, who was the editorial head of the War Records office, and from his successor, Colonel H. M. Lazelle; and thanks are due to General Adam Badeau, George E. Pond, Colonel John P. Nicholson, Colonel G. C. Kniffin, and to General Marcus J. Wright, Agent of the War Department for the Collection of Confederate Records. Material for the illustrations, which form a most striking and not the least important feature of the work, has been received from
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
ngineers Brig.-Gen. Joseph G. Totten (died April 22, 1864) Brig.-Gen. Richard Delafield. Ordnance Department Colonel Henry K. Craig (until April 23, 1861) Brig.-Gen. James W. Ripley (retired Sept. 15, 1863) Brig.-Gen. George D. Ramsay (retired Sept. 12, 1864) Brig.-Gen. Alexander B. Dyer. Bureau of military justice Major John F. Lee (resigned Sept. 4, 1862) Brig.-Gen. Joseph Holt. Bureau of the provost Marshal General (created by act of March 3, 1863) Brig.-Gen. James B. Fry. General officers of the United States army, January 1, 1861 Brevet Lieut.-Gen. Winfield Scott (General-in-chief) Brig.-General John E. Wool Brig.-General David E. Twiggs Brig.-General William S. Harney. (Note.-E. V. Sumner was promoted Brigadier-General March 16, 1861, vice David E. Twiggs, dismissed March 1, 1861.) * Afterward in the Confederate service. The United States Navy Department. Secretary of the Navy: Gideon Welles. Assistant Secretary:
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McDowell's advance to Bull Run. (search)
McDowell's advance to Bull Run. James B. Fry, Brevet Major-General, U. S. A. (at Bull Run, Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General on Mcdowell's Staff). Scrutinizing a pass at the Washington end of the long Bridge. As President Buchanan's administration was drawing to a close, he was forced by the action of the South to decide whether the power of the general Government should be used to coerce into submission States that had attempted to secede from the Union. His opinion was that the contingency was not provided for, that while a State had no right to secede, the Constitution gave no authority to coerce, and that he had no right to do anything except hold the property and enforce the laws of the United States. Before he went out of office the capital of the nation seemed to be in danger of seizure. For its protection, and in order to consult about holding Southern forts and arsenals; General Scott was in December called to Washington, from which he had been absent s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing armies at the first Bull Run. (search)
ohn C. Tidball; Bookwood's N. Y. battery, Captain Charles Bookwood. Brigade loss: k, 6; w, 16; m, 96 = 118. Second Brigade, Col. Thomas A. Davies: 16th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Samuel Marsh; 18th N. Y., Col. W. A. Jackson; 31st N. Y., Col. C. E. Pratt; 32d N. Y., Col. R. Matheson; G, 2d U. S. Arty., Lieut. O. D. Greene. Brigade loss: w, 2; m, 1 = 3. Total loss of the Union army: killed, 460; wounded, 1124; captured or missing, 1312,--grand total, 2896. Strength of the Union army. General James B. Fry, who was General McDowell's adjutant-general, prepared in October, 1884, a statement of the strength of the army, in brief as follows: It was not practicable at the time to ascertain the strength of the army with accuracy; and it is impossible now to make a return which can be pronounced absolutely correct. The abstract which appears on page 309, vol. II., Official Records, is not a return of McDowell's army at the battle of Bull Run, and was not prepared by me, but, as I un
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
Evans struggling against great odds, he crossed the valley and formed on the right and a little in advance of him. Here the 5 or 6 regiments, with 6 field-pieces, held their ground for an hour against 10,000 or 12,000 United States troops, General Fry (page 185) states that these troops were Andrew Porter's and Burnside's brigades, and one regiment of Heintzelman's division. Reckoning by the estimate of strength given by General Fry on page 194 these would have made a total of about 6500 mGeneral Fry on page 194 these would have made a total of about 6500 men.-editors. when, finding they were overlapped on each flank by the continually arriving enemy, General Bee fell back to the position from which he had moved to rescue Evans — crossing the valley, closely pressed by the Federal army. Hampton with his Legion reached the valley as the retrograde movement began. Forming it promptly, he joined in the action, and contributed greatly to the orderly character of the retreat by his courage and admirable soldiership, seconded by the excellent cond
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
ng breakfast at Nelson's camp Sunday morning, when the sound of artillery was heard up the river. We knew of no ground to apprehend a serious engagement, but the troops were promptly prepared to march, and I walked with my chief of staff, Colonel James B. Fry, to Grant's quarters at Savannah, but he had started up the river. I there saw General C. F. Smith, who was in his bed sick, but apparently not dangerously ill. He had no apprehension about a battle, thought it an affair of outposts, and with the battery of rifle field-guns nearer the river; to all of these the term Reserve artillery has been given on the map (page 503).-D. C. B. Just as the danger was perceived, Colonel Webster, Grant's chief of artillery, rapidly approached Colonel Fry and myself. The idea of getting the battery which was standing in park into action was expressed simultaneously by the three, and was promptly executed by Colonel Webster's immediate exertion. General Grant came up a few minutes later, and a