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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 35 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 29 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 10 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 6 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 21 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 13 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 12 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for James B. Fry or search for James B. Fry in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 6 document sections:

By command of Brigadier-General McDowell. James B. Fry, Adjutant-General. The following was G By command of Brigadier-General McDowell. James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. To the Co. Washington, D. C., August 5, 161. Captain J. B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General United Statevision, Arlington, Va., July 25, 1861. Capt. J. B. Fry, A. A. J. :--I have the honor to submit t N. E. Va. Washington, July 31, 1861. To Capt. Jas. B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General: sir: In on, camp near Alexandria, July 24, 1861. Capt. James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarterion troops, N. R. Va., July 25, 1861. To Capt. James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General, Gen. McDoweport. Arlington, Va., July 23, 1861. Capt. J. B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General, HeadquartersS. King, Sur. and Med. Diree'r, U. S. A. Capt. J. B. Fry, Asst. Adjt.-Gen., U. S. A. Subsistenm, sir, very respectfully, H. F. Clarke, Capt. and Com. Subs. Capt. James B. Fry, Ass't Adj.-Gen. [1 more...]
shall arrest, or attempt to arrest, any citizen not in arms at the time, or search or attempt to search any house, or even to enter the same without permission. The troops must behave themselves with as much forbearance and propriety as if they were at their own homes. They are here to fight the enemies of the country, not to judge and punish the unarmed and defenceless, however guilty they may be. When necessary, that will be done by the proper person. By command of Gen. McDowell: James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. The chimney stacks, being of brick, are the sole remains of the few good houses in the village. Here our driver made a mistake, which was the rather persisted in, that a colored chattel informed us we could get to Centreville by the route we were pursuing, instead of turning back to Germantown, as we should have done. Centreville was still seven miles ahead. The guns sounded, however, heavily from the valleys. Rising above the forest tops appeared the
dquarters, Department N. E. Virginia, Washington, July 8, 1861. Until otherwise ordered, the following will be the organization of the troops in this Department: staff of the Department Commander. Adjutant--General's Department.--Captain James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Aides-de-Camp.--First-Lieutenant H. W. Kingsbury, 5th Artillery; Major Clarence S. Brown, N. Y. State Militia; Major James S. Wordsworth, N. Y. State Militia. Acting Inspector-General.--Major W. H. Wood, 1724th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. Second Brigade.--Colonel Davies, New York Volunteers, commanding. 16th, 18th, 31st, & 32d Regiments New York Volunteers; Company G, 2d Artillery, (Light Battery.) By command of Brig.-Gen. McDowell. James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General. Boston Transcript narrative. Washington, July 18, 1861. It was a glorious sight, and a rarely interesting privilege, to witness the moving of the advance of General McDowell's vast column of troops to
a police force under him, whose special and sole duty it shall be to preserve the property from depredations, and to arrest all wrong-doers of whatever regiment or corps they may be. Any persons found committing the slightest depredation, killing pigs or poultry, or trespassing on the property of the inhabitants,will be reported to Headquarters, and the least that will be done to them will be to send them to the Alexandria jail. It is again ordered that no one shall arrest or attempt to arrest any citizen not in arms at the time, or search or attempt to search any house, or even to enter the same without permission. The troops must behave themselves with as much forbearance and propriety as if they were at their own homes. They are here to fight the enemies of the country, not to judge and punish the unarmed and defenseless, however guilty they may be. When necessary, that will be done by the proper person. By command of Gen. Mcdowell, Jas. B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General.
e proper moment he displayed capacity for command and personal gallantry. Col. Moore, commanding the 1st Virginia volunteers, was severely wounded at the head of his regiment, the command of which subsequently devolved upon Major Skinner, Lieut.-Col. Fry having been obliged to leave the field in consequence of a sun-stroke. An accomplished, promising officer, Major Carter H. Herrison, 11th regiment Virginia volunteers, was lost to the service while leading two companies of his regiment ag Brigadier-General Longstreet, while finding on all sides alacrity, ardor and intelligence, mentions his special obligations to Cols. Moore, Garland, and Corse, commanding, severally, regiments of his brigade, and to their field-officers, Lieut.-Cols. Fry, Funsten, and Munford, and Majors Brent and Skinner, of whom he says: they displayed more coolness and energy than is usual among veterans of the old service. General Longstreet also mentions the conduct of Captain Marey, of the 17th Virgin
eserve, in support of Hunt's and Titball's batteries. After completing these arrangements, I returned to Blenker's brigade, now near a mile from Centreville heights, took a regiment to cover Green's battery, and then returned to the heights. When I arrived there just before dusk, I found all my previous arrangements of defence had been changed nor could I ascertain who had ordered it, for Gen. McDowell was not on the field. Col. Richardson was the first person I spoke to after passing Capt. Fry; he was leading his regiment into line of battle on the crest of the hill, and directly in the way of the batteries in rear. It was here the conversation between the Colonel and myself took place which he alludes to in his report. General McDowell just afterward came on to the field, and I appealed earnestly to him to permit me to command my division, and protested against the faulty disposition of the troops to resist an attack. He replied by taking command himself and relieving me.