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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 481 1 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 69 5 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 41 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 38 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 30 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 29 1 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 22 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Margaret Fuller or search for Margaret Fuller in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 12: Longfellow (search)
aeus (1872), and Michael Angelo (1883),—the slightest trace of dramatic genius. A poet of literary derivation, so to phrase it, inspired by his own wide reading, and a useful transmitter of culture he could not help being from first to last, and his growing reputation naturally prompted him to undertake elaborate works in a form of art practised by preceding poets in every age. His countrymen were not exigent critics, and were inclined to resent it when he was accused, as by Poe and by Margaret Fuller, of unoriginality; latter-day readers are likely to skim, or else altogether to neglect the dramas that are protected from complete oblivion by the venerated and still venerable name. If they desire any justification for their conduct, such prudent readers may ejaculate habent sua fata libelli, or may recall the facts that Dr. Samuel Johnson wrote Irene and William Wordsworth, The Borderers. In all probability, neither of these ominous dramatic productions was in Longfellow's mind
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), chapter 1.9 (search)
organ of the new thought had long been talked of, and as early as 1835 Emerson had proposed to Carlyle that the latter come to America and act as editor. It was not until July, 1840, however, that the first number of The Dial appeared, with Margaret Fuller as editor, and Emerson, Alcott, and Thoreau among the contributors. The magazine was never financially successful, the smallness of its subscription list being indicated by the rarity of complete sets today. Margaret Fuller, after serving Margaret Fuller, after serving gratuitously for two years, reluctantly resigned the editorship, and Emerson as reluctantly took it up, noting in his diary: I wish it to live, but I do not wish to be its life. Neither do I like to put it into the hands of the Humanity and Reform Men, because they trample on letters and poetry; nor in the hands of the scholars, for they are dead and dry. After spending much time and some money Emerson too felt forced to abandon the undertaking, and The Dial came to an end with the close of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 21: Newspapers, 1775-1860 (search)
the first, the staff which made the Tribune represented a broad catholicity of interests and tastes, in the world of thought as well as in the world of action, and a solid excellence in ability and in organization which were largely the result of the genius of Greeley and over which he was the master spirit. It included Henry J. Raymond, who later became Greeley's rival on the Times, George M. Snow, George William Curtis, Charles A. Dana, Bayard Taylor, George Ripley, William H. Fry, Margaret Fuller, Edmund Quincy, and Charles T. Congdon. It is easy to understand how with such a group of writers the idea of the literary newspaper, which had been alive from the beginning of the century, should have advanced well-nigh to its greatest perfection. The great popular strength of the Tribune doubtless lay in its disinterested sympathy with all the ideals and sentiments which stirred the popular mind in the forties and fifties. We cannot afford, Greeley wrote, to reject unexamined any
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
ilkins, 360, 364, 382, 390 Freeman's journal, the, 299 Free press (Detroit), 182 Free press (Newburyport), The, 44 Freiligrath, P., 271 Fremont, John C., 283 French, Alice, 379, 388, 390 Freneau, Philip, 150, 177, 180, 181, 241 Friendship's Offering, 174 Froissart, 124, 332 Front Yard, the, 382 Frost, Rev., Barzillai, 5 Frost, John, 404 Frothingham, Octavius Brooks, 197 Froude, J. H., 137 Fruin, Professor, 138, 139, 140, 141 Fry, William H., 192 Fuller, Margaret, 37, 165, 192 Fulton, M. G., 304 Furness, Horace Howard, 197 Furness, William Henry, 197, 211 Future of the American negro, the, 325 Gabriel Conroy, 380, 387 Gachard, L. P., 138 Gales, 181 Gallatin, Albert, 89 Gallegher and other stories, 388, 392 Garfield, James A., 220 Garland, Hamlin, 363, 388, 390 Garland, the, 174 Garrison, William Lloyd, 44, 50, 51, 188, 189, 193 Garrison of Cape Anne, the, 48 Gayangos, Pascal de, 127 Gazette (Boston), 178 G