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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for R. D. Funkhouser or search for R. D. Funkhouser in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. (search)
r in October; died in December, 1861. Jacobs, Bayley S., first lieutenant and captain; was killed at Gettysburg. Updike, John B., second lieutenant and first lieutenant, captain; wounded at Spotsylvania, 12th of May, 1864, and retired. Funkhouser, Robert D., Jr., second lieutenant, first lieutenant, captain and acting lieutenant-colonel; wounded at Winchester, 19th of September, 1864, and captured at Fort Steadman, near Petersburg, 25th of March, 1865. Boyd, Emory V., orderly sergeanWalton, Rice, wounded at Hatcher's Run. Ward, Samuel, wounded at Hatcher's Run. Lieutenant John G. Brown and Sergeant William A. Compton, of Front Royal, Va., and John L. Jarman, Lucien A. Michie, of Albemarle County, Va., and myself, have made out the foregoing roll as accuate as possible, as no roll of the last recruits is in our possession, but one made out November 1, 1864, is in Washington, D. C., I am informed.by General Ainsworth, of which I failed to get a copy. R. D. Funkhouser.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), From Manassas to Frazier's Farm. (search)
ed trees we became mixed up, but still trying to go forward. I noticed Colonel, afterwards General, Bryan Grymes, of the 4th North Carolina, riding near me, carrying the flag of his regiment, the bearer having been shot down. When I called to him to let me carry the flag, saying, too, that he would be killed, he replied, calmly: Lieutenant, your life is worth as much as mine. I did not think of the awkward looks of a Virginian carrying a North Carolina flag for them, and I do not know whether the General did or not. The morning after the battle of Frazier's Farm, June 30, 1862, I was detailed to take command of forty-five skirmishers to charge the bluecoats out of a barn, and when we started at double quick it looked like going into the jaws of death. We were greatly relieved when the enemy hoisted the white flag and surrendered, sixty-two of them, for the whole Yankee Army had left the night previous for Malvern Hill. R. D. Funkhouser. Maurertown, Shenandoah Co., Va., 1906.