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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Edward G. Furber or search for Edward G. Furber in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 18: capture of forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the surrender of New Orleans. (search)
thoroughly screened from the forts by a thick growth of wood. The mast-heads of the schooners rose above the trees, and afforded a capital outlook from which to direct the fire, but being ingeniously covered with brush, they were rendered indistinguishable to the Confederate gunners. The mortar vessels were organized as-follows: First division, Lieut. Com. Watson Smith, consisted of the following vessels: Norfolk Packet, Lieut. Smith; O. H. Lee, Act. Mast. Godfrey; Para, Act. Mast. Furber; C. P. Williams, Act. Mast. Lang-thorne; Arletta, Act. Mast. Smith; Bacon, Act. Mast. Rogers; Sophronia, Act. Mast. Bartholomew. Second division, under Lieut. W. W. Queen: T. A. Ward, Lieut. Queen; M. J. Carlton, Act. Mast. Jack; Matthew Vassar, Act. Mast. Savage; George Mang-ham, Act. Mast. Collins; Orvetta, Act. Mast. Blanchard; Sidney C. Jones, Act. Mast. Graham; Adolph Hugel, Act. Mast. Van Buskirk. Third division.--Lieut. K. R. Breese: John Griffiths, Act. Mast. Henry Br
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
, was placed at this point, 2,850 yards from Fort Jackson, 3,680 from St. Philip; the vessels were then dropped in a line close to each other, their positions having been marked by the Coast Survey party, and Messrs. Oltmanns and Harris superintending personally that each one was acquainted with proper distance. Next to Lieutenant-Commander Smith's division of seven vessels (Norfolk Packet, Lieutenant-Commander Watson Smith; Oliver H. Lee, Acting-Master Washington Godfrey; Para, Acting-Master Edward G. Furber; C. P. Williams, Acting-Master Amos R. Langthorne; Arletta, Acting-Master Thomas E. Smith; William Bacon, Acting-Master William P. Rogers; Sophronia, Acting-Master Lyman Bartholomew) was placed the six vessels of the third divison, under Lieutenant-Commander K. R. Breese (John Griffith, Acting-Master Henry Brown; Sarah Bruen, Acting-Master Abraham Christian; Racer, Acting-Master Alvin Phinney; Sea Foam, Acting-Master Henry E. Williams; Henry James, Acting-Master Lewis W. Penningt
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
-Assistant Paymaster, C. C. Walden; Acting-Second-Assistant Engineer, Wm. R. Green; Acting-Third-Assistant Engineers, G. S. Baker, Chas. W. Smith and John Van Hogan; Acting-Masters' Mate, J. P. Arnett. Steamer Wissahickon. Lieutenant Commanding, A. N. Smith. Mortar flotilla. First division. Lieutenant Watson Smith, Commanding Division. Schooner Norfolk Packet.--Lieutenant Watson Smith. Schooner Oliver H. Lee.--Acting-Master Wash. Godfrey. Schooner Para.--Acting-Master Edward G. Furber. Schooner C. P. Williams.--Acting-Master A. R. Langthorne. Schooner Arletta.--Acting-Master Thomas E. Smith. Schooner William Bacon.--Acting-Master Wm. R. Rogers. Schooner Sophronia.--Acting-Master Lyman Bartholomew. Second division. Lieutenant W. W. Queen, Commanding Division. Schooner T. A. Ward.--Lieutenant W. W. Queen. Schooner M. T. Carlton. --Acting-Master Chas. E. Jack. Schooner Matthew Vassar.--Acting-Master Hugh H. Savage. Schooner George Ma
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
ble, and therefore the troops should be withdrawn from John's Island. These operations lasted about six days, during which there was a good deal of hard work and the usual display of gallantry on the part of the Navy, under the guns of which the Army safely re embarked. Rear-Admiral Dahlgren speaks handsomely of his staff, and particularly mentions the services of Commander Balch and Lieutenant-Commanders Semmes, Fillebrown, A. W. Johnson, R. L. Phythian, and Acting-Masters Phinney and Furber. This was about the last operation of any importance that occurred in the South Atlantic squadron up to October 22, when the account of its operations for the year ended. Some minor expeditions were undertaken — in one of which the brig Perry lost fifteen men in killed, wounded and prisoners — and in another a schooner loaded with cotton was set on fire and burned by a party of brave fellows; but we miss the exciting scenes which occurred in the attacks on the batteries of Charleston, wh