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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 2 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burr, Aaron, 1716- (search)
. and, fearing to fall into his hands, he resolved to disband his men and fly. He told them to sell what provisions they had, and, if they chose, to settle on his Washita lands. They dispersed through the Mississippi Territory, and furnished an abundant supply of school-masters. singing-masters, dancing-masters, and doctors. A reward was offered for the capture of Burr, and he was arrested (Feb. 19. 1807) by the Register of the Land-office, assisted by Lieut. (afterwards Maj.-Gen.) Edmund P. Gaines, near Fort Stoddart, on the Tombigbee River, in eastern Mississippi. An indictment for high treason was found Against Burr by a grand jury for the District of Virginia. He was charged with levying war, by the collection of armed men at Blennerhassett's Island, within the dominion of Virginia. He was also charged with concocting a scheme for the overthrow of the national authority in the Western States and Territories. On these charges he was tried and acquitted. After his acquitt
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gaines, Edmund Pendleton 1777-1849 (search)
Gaines, Edmund Pendleton 1777-1849 Military officer; born in Culpeper county, Va., March 20, 1777; removed with his family to Tennessee in 1790; entered the army as ensign in 1799; and was promoted to lieutenant-colonel in the summer of 1812. Hhis gallant conduct at Fort Erie in August, that year, he was brevetted major-general. For that exploit, and Edmund Pendleton Gaines. his general good services during the war, Congress gave him thanks and a gold medal. Gaines served under JacksGaines served under Jackson in the Creek War, and fought the Seminoles in 1836. Late in life he married Myra Clark, of New Orleans, heiress of a large estate, who, after his death, became General Gaines's medal. famous for her successful persistence in litigation to secur Late in life he married Myra Clark, of New Orleans, heiress of a large estate, who, after his death, became General Gaines's medal. famous for her successful persistence in litigation to secure her rights. He died in New Orleans, June 6. 1849.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gaines, Fort. (search)
Gaines, Fort. See Mobile, Ala.; forts Morgan and Gaines.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gaines, Myra Clark 1805-1813 (search)
Gaines, Myra Clark 1805-1813 Claimant; wife of Edmund Pendleton Gaines; daughter of Daniel Clark, who was born in Sligo, Ireland, and emigrated to New Orleans, where Myra was born in 1805. Her father inherited a large estate from his uncle in 1799, and died in New Orleans, Aug. 16, 1813, devising all his property to his mother, Mary Clark. Myra married first W. W. Whitney in 1832, and on his death General Gaines in 1839. She claimed the estate of her father, who was reputed a bachelor a to New Orleans, where Myra was born in 1805. Her father inherited a large estate from his uncle in 1799, and died in New Orleans, Aug. 16, 1813, devising all his property to his mother, Mary Clark. Myra married first W. W. Whitney in 1832, and on his death General Gaines in 1839. She claimed the estate of her father, who was reputed a bachelor at the time of his death, and after a litigation of over fifty years she succeeded in establishing her rights. She died in New Orleans, Jan. 9, 1885.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Georgia, (search)
the party who had assented to it. He and another chief were shot, April 30. A new question now arose. Governor Troup contended that upon the ratification of the treaty the fee simple of the lands vested in Georgia. He took measures for a survey of the lands, under the authority of the legislature of Georgia, and to distribute them among the white inhabitants of the State. The remonstrances of the Creeks caused President Adams to appoint a special agent to investigate the matter, and General Gaines was sent with a competent force to prevent any disturbance. The agent reported that bad faith and corruption had marked the treaty, and that forty-nine-fiftieths of the Creeks were hostile to it. The President determined not to allow interference with the Indians until the next meeting of Congress. Troup determined, at first, to execute the treaty in spite of the President, but the firmness of the latter made the governor hesitate. A new negotiation was opened with the Creeks, and fin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Medals. (search)
21, 1814Capt. Lewis WarringtonCapture of the EpervierGold. Nov. 3, 1814Capt. Johnston Blakely (to the widow)Capture of the ReindeerGold. Nov. 3, 1814Maj.-Gen. Jacob BrownVictory of Chippewa, etc.Gold. Nov. 3, 1814Maj.-Gen. Peter B. PorterVictory of Chippewa, etc.Gold. Nov. 3, 1814Brig.-Gen. E. W. RipleyVictory of Chippewa, etc.Gold. Nov. 3, 1814Brig.-Gen. James MillerVictory of Chippewa, etc.Gold. Nov. 3, 1814Maj.-Gen. Winfield ScottVictory of Chippewa, etc.Gold. Nov. 3, 1814Maj.-Gen. Edmund P. GainesVictory of ErieGold. Nov. 3, 1814Maj.-Gen. Alexander MacombVictory of PlattsburgGold. Feb. 27, 1815Maj.-Gen. Andrew JacksonVictory of New OrleansGold. Feb. 22, 1816Capt. Charles StewartCapture of the Cyane and LevantGold. Feb. 22, 1816Capt. James BiddleCapture of the PenguinGold. April 4, 1818Maj.-Gen. William H. HarrisonVictory of the ThamesGold. April 4, 1818Gov. Isaac Shelby.Victory of the ThamesGold. Feb. 13, 1835Col. George Groghan (22 years after)Defence of Fort Stevens
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
Department of Interior created by act approved......March 3, 1849 Work of census office, previously under Secretary of State, transferred to the Interior by act......March 3, 1849 Thirtieth Congress adjourns......March 3, 1849 sixteenth administration—Whig, March 5, 1849, to March 3, 1853. Zachary Taylor, Louisiana, President. Millard Fillmore, New York, Vice-President. Gen. William J. Worth, U. S. A., dies at San Antonio, Tex., aged fifty-five......May 7, 1849 Gen. Edmund P. Gaines dies at New Orleans, aged seventy-two......June 6, 1849 James K. Polk, eleventh President, dies at Nashville, Tenn., aged fifty-four......June 15, 1849 President Taylor issues a proclamation against filibustering expeditions to Cuba under Lopez......Aug. 11, 1849 Albert Gallatin, distinguished statesman, dies at Astoria, L. I.......Aug. 12, 1849 Thirty-first Congress, first session, assembles......Dec. 3, 1849 Senate strongly Democratic, and in the House the Free-soile