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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 16, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Judge William Brockenbrough. (search)
d exclaimed: The ancients did old Argus prize, Because he had a hundred eyes; But much more praise to him is due Who looks a hundred ways with two. The judge was so nonplussed and surprised by the offender's smartness, as well as audacity, that he let him off without fining him. He was the renowned, but unfortunate, Billy Pope, orator, poet and wit. I have, too, some recollection of the members of the bar of that period. Thomas Gresham and Wm. A. Wright lived in Tappahannock; John Gaines, two Upshaws (Horace and Edwin), and Muscoe Garnett, came from the country; Phil. Branham and Chinn came across the Rappahannock; Richard Baylor from the upper part of the county, and John L. Marye and Carter L. Stevenson from Fredericksburg. Mr. Marye had lived in Tappahannock, where he served in the store of Mr. Robert Weir. Whilst I was at school in Fredericksburg, I became well acquainted with him and Mr. Stevenson, and intimate with their sons. My last Essex county teacher, James
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
vis; died at home. Joseph A. Davis; living. Albert Davis; died at home. Robert D. Diggs; living. John Donavan; living. Joseph S. Estis; dead. Frank B. Estis; died at Eimira, N. Y. Archy H. Eubank; living. Dunbar Edwards; died at hospital. Alfred Edwards; killed at Petersburg, June 15, 1864. John H. Eager; living. Richard Garrett; died at Elmira, N. Y. Thomas C. Garrett, captured at Petersburg, June 15, 1864; died at home. Augustus Garrett; living. John Gaines; died at home. Ben. Groom; died at hospital. George Gibson; killed at Howlett House, May 18, 1864. John C. Gibson; living. Adolphus Gibson; killed at Petersburg, May 18, 1864. B. E. Guthrie; died at home. Charles H. Huckstep; died at hospital. Allen Hilliard; died at home. William H. Hurtt; died at Elmira, N. Y. William Hogg; died at home. Joseph N. Knapp; living. Joseph Landrum; died at Soldiers' Home. Myrick Newcomb; died at Elmira, N. Y. William A
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
vis; died at home. Joseph A. Davis; living. Albert Davis; died at home. Robert D. Diggs; living. John Donavan; living. Joseph S. Estis; dead. Frank B. Estis; died at Eimira, N. Y. Archy H. Eubank; living. Dunbar Edwards; died at hospital. Alfred Edwards; killed at Petersburg, June 15, 1864. John H. Eager; living. Richard Garrett; died at Elmira, N. Y. Thomas C. Garrett, captured at Petersburg, June 15, 1864; died at home. Augustus Garrett; living. John Gaines; died at home. Ben. Groom; died at hospital. George Gibson; killed at Howlett House, May 18, 1864. John C. Gibson; living. Adolphus Gibson; killed at Petersburg, May 18, 1864. B. E. Guthrie; died at home. Charles H. Huckstep; died at hospital. Allen Hilliard; died at home. William H. Hurtt; died at Elmira, N. Y. William Hogg; died at home. Joseph N. Knapp; living. Joseph Landrum; died at Soldiers' Home. Myrick Newcomb; died at Elmira, N. Y. William A
or braver men than the Germans. The enemy was dreadfully defeated beyond a doubt, and with his demoralization and his rapidly disbanding regiments he cannot with any immediate movement menace our own Army of the Potomac, which stands now with no superior in history, ancient or modern. The victories we have recently won are clearly among the grandest on record. The enemy was assailed by Jackson, on the memorable 2d of May, in a position (as the Whig justly says,) stronger than that at Gaines's Mill, and driven from it. The Wilderness was a fastness which an army ought to hold against almost any colds; yet what do we see? A Confederate force drives out of that position an army of Yankees at least three times as numerous as itself! Is not that a great victory? Is not that something to boast of? Something to be rejoiced at? Can an army immediately recover from such a defeat as our enemy received there? Let us thank God for this grand triple triumph! and let us, putting o
Mayor's Court, Monday, April 15th. --William McClure was bound over to keep the peace for 12 months for placing dead bodies in the house in Belvin's block occupied by him, thereby causing noxious smalls, detrimental to the health of the neighborhood. Royal, slave of S. C. Hatcher, was ordered 20 lashes for stealing 30 lbs. of bacon from the Confederate States. John Gaines, a free negro, was ordered the same punishment for aiding in the robbery. Mike Sweeny, instigated by the "green eyed monster," stabbed Frederick Deitrick in the neck with a knife, on 17th st., on Thursday, producing a very severe wound, of which Dietrick may not recover. He was brought up to answer. The wounded man did not appear. The case was continued until the 19th inst. John D. Farrell, charged with being disorderly in the Theatre, was let off. John Flannigan and Mike Larkin, arrested for interfering with the watch, and being suspicious characters, were discharged. Lucy Morg