hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 3, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
ed the naming of the forts and batteries at Knoxville, that constituted its defenses, in honor (of officers who fell there. The following is a list of the forts and batteries, their position and their names, as mentioned in Burnside's order: Battery Noble, south of Kingston road, in memory of Lieutenant and Adjutant William Noble, Second Michigan. Fort Byington, at the College, in memory of Major Cornelius Byington, Second Michigan. Battery Galpin, east of Second Creek, in memory of Lieutenant Galpin, Second Michigan. Fort Comstock, on Summit Hill, in memory of Lieutenant-Colonel Comstock, Seventeenth Michigan. Battery Wiltsie, west of Gay Street, in memory of Captain Wiltsie, Twentieth Michigan. Fort Huntington Smith, on Temperance Hill, in memory of Lieutenant Huntington Smith, Twentieth Michigan. Battery Clifton Lee, east of Fort H. Smith, in memory of Captain Clifton Lee, One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois Mounted Infantry. Fort Hill, at the extreme eastern point of the Union lin
memory of Lieutenant and Adjutant William Noble, Second Michigan volunteers, who fell in the charge upon the enemy's rifle-pits, in front of Fort Sanders, on the morning of November twenty-fourth. Fort Byington--At College, after Major Cornelius Byington, Second Michigan volunteers, who fell mortally wounded, while leading the assault upon the enemy's rifle-pits, in front of Fort Sanders, on the morning of November twenty-fourth. Battery Galpin--East of Second Creek, in memory of Lieutenant Galpin, Second Michigan volunteers, who fell in the assault upon the enemy's rifle-pits, in front of Fort Sanders, on the morning of November twenty-fourth. Fort Comstock--On Summit Hill, near the railroad depot, in memory of Lieutenant-Colonel Comstock, Seventeenth Michigan volunteers, who fell in our lines during the siege. Battery Wiltsee--West of Gay street, in memory of Captain Wiltsee, Twentieth Michigan volunteers, who was mortally wounded in our lines during the siege. Fort H
p one of the city papers in which appeared the advertisement of Mr. Taylor, of Charleston, offering $1,000 for Edie's arrest, and one fourth of the money receiver.-- Down went the breakfast, and off went the proprietor, partly in quiet of his $100 and partly in search of Edie, who must either be in Richmond or en route to Tappahannock. The Clerk at the Powhatan readily responds to the question as to Mr. Edie departure. He had not left — was not in the house — but was supposed to be with Miss Galpin, a boarder at Madams Demorrit's, and the sutodian of his protection papers. An officer was at once engaged, and the place of refuge of the unfortunate Edie immediately sought out. The lady of the house indignantly denied the presence of any gentleman, but a search of the promises proved her denial to be unfounded. In a room in the upper story of the house he was found lying upon the floor wrapped up in a sheet, with a pillow under his head. From this secluded haunt he was dragged forth