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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for W. M. Gamble or search for W. M. Gamble in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
asters' Mates, Geo. Leonard, John Leeds and Frank Kemble; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, H. LeRoy Jones. Gun-boat Albatross. Lieutenant-Commander, John E. Hart; 2d Assistant Engineer, C. H. Ball; Acting-Masters, T. B. Dubois and C. S. Washburne; Acting-Ensign, J. H. Harris; Acting-Masters' Mate, Wm. Harcourt; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, W. J. Burge; Acting Assistant Paymaster, G. R. Martin, Acting Engineers, J. W. Smyth, L. J. M. Boyd and C. H. Slack. Steamer Pocahontas. Lieutenant-Commander, W. M. Gamble; Lieutenant, J. F. McGlensey; Assistant Surgeon, A. C. Rhoades; Assistant Engineers, Caleb E. Lee, W. F. Fort and G. C. Julan; Acting-Masters, Edw. Baker and Thomas Symmes; Acting-Masters' Mates, J. M. Braisted, O. S. Willey and Caleb Fellowes; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Theo. Kitchen; Acting-Engineer, John Jordan. Gun-boat Kennebeck. Lieutenant-Commander, John H. Russell; Assistant Surgeon, Chas. H. Perry; Assistant Engineers, Henry W. Fitch, B. C. Gowing, E. E. Roberts
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
Thatcher and his officers for the apparent want of that prudence which every officer should exhibit in all military operations, who has the lives of officers and men at his disposal. It is well known now that Mobile was better supplied with torpedoes than any other point, with perhaps the exception of the James River, and those at Mobile having been put down at the last moment were more than usually dangerous. The Milwaukee, Lieutenant-Commander J. H. Gillis, and the Osage, Lieutenant-Commander W. M. Gamble, were sunk at the entrance to Blakely River, the former on the 28th of March and the latter on the 29th. The tin-clad Rodolph was sunk by a torpedo on the 1st of April, while towing a scow with implements to try and raise the Milwaukee. These, with the two steam-tugs, two launches, and the gun-boat Sciota (blown up), made eight vessels in all destroyed on this occasion. Fortunately the war was over and the Government did not need the vessels, which were valuable ones. The