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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Signorina Garcia or search for Signorina Garcia in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: little Julia Ward 1819-1835; aet. 1-16 (search)
nd and chief adviser, we shall speak later on. We have dwelt upon the generation preceding our mother's, because all these people, the beautiful mother so early lost, so long loved and mourned, the sternly devoted father, the vivacious aunts, the stalwart uncles, were strong influences in the life of Julia Ward. The amusements of the little Wards were few, compared with those of children of to-day. As a child of seven, Julia was taken twice to the opera, and heard Malibran, then Signorina Garcia, a pleasure the memory of which remained with her through life. About this time Mr. Ward's views of religious duty deepened in stringency and in gloom. There was no more opera, nor did Julia ever attend a theatre until she was a grown woman. In Low Church circles at that time, the drama was considered distinctly of the devil. The burning of the first Bowery Theatre and of the great theatre at Richmond, Virginia, were spoken of as judgments. Many an Evangelical pastor improved the o
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: the corner --1835-1839; aet. 16-20 (search)
ock, a pupil of Cramer, to whom she always felt that she owed a great deal. Not only did he train her fingers so carefully that after eighty years they still retained their flexibility, but he also trained and developed her inborn taste for all that was best in music. As she grew toward girlhood, the good master found that her voice promised to be a remarkable one, and recommended to her father Signor Cardini, formerly an intimate of the Garcia family, and thoroughly versed in the famous Garcia method. Under his care Julia's voice developed into a pure, clear mezzo-soprano, of uncommon range and exquisite quality. She felt all through her life the benefit of those early lessons. When she was eighty years old she attended a meeting of the National Peace Society at Park Street Church, Boston. The church was packed with people. When her turn came to speak, the kindly chairman said:-- Ladies and Gentlemen, we are now to have the great pleasure of listening to Mrs. Howe. I am
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: Santo Domingo 1872-1874; aet. 53-56 (search)
ith him? he asked. She should preach to her colored folks as much as she liked. They sailed together in the Tybee in March. After a brief visit to the capital (where Revolution had been before them, expelling the friendly Baez, and putting in his place a man opposed to the Samana Bay Company), they took up their quarters at Samana, in a little hillside cottage about a mile from the town. Our mother writes in her Journal:-- March 20. In Santo Domingo as glad as a child.... Went to Garcia's and foolishly bargained for the gold necklace and emerald ring I fancied the last time I was here. The necklace is for Maud. The love of jewelry was one of the little passions of her whole life. Speaking once of this as her besetting sin, she said: It is rather respectable to have a besetting sin, as it shows one must have had an ancestor from whom it was inherited! She enjoyed a jewel as she did a flower or a song: she loved to deck her dear ones and herself with trinkets; a jewell
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
nd lastly, that I might serve in some way until the last breath leaves my body.... December 16. I had greatly desired to see the Barber. kind Mrs. [Alfred] Batcheller made it possible by inviting me to go with her. The performance was almost if not quite bouffe. Sembrich's singing marvellous, the acting of the other characters excellent, and singing very good, especially that of de Reszke and Campanari. I heard the opera in New York more than seventy years ago, when Malibran, then Signorina Garcia, took the part of Rosina. December 31. ... Advertiser man came with a query: what event in 1899 will have the greatest influence in the world's history? I replied, the Czar's Peace Manifesto, leading to the Conference at the Hague. November, 1899, saw the birth of another Institution from which she was to derive much pleasure, the Boston Authors' Club. Miss Helen M. Winslow first evolved the idea of such a Club. After talking with Mmes. May Alden Ward and Mabel Loomis Todd, who
ious Club, see Radical Club. Freeman, Edward, I, 95, 134. Freeman, Mrs., Edward, I, 95, 134. Fremdenblatt, II, 19. French Revolution, I, 12. Fries, Wulf, I, 145. From the Oak to the Olive, I, 265, 269. Frothingham, Octavius, I, 304. Froude, J. A., I, 86. Fuller, Margaret, I, 69, 72, 87, 346; I, 76, 84, 85, 86, 142; II, 404, 405. Furness, W. H., I, 304. Gainsborough, Lady, nx, 6. Gallup, Charles, II, 310. Galveston, II, 279. Gambetta, Leon, II, 25. Garcia method, I, 43. Gardiner, I, 122, 163, 194, 337. Gardiner, J. H., II, 267. Gardner, Mrs., Jack, I, 70, 82, 150, 182, 192. Garfield, J. A., II, 69. Garibaldi, Giuseppe, II, 242. Garrett, Thomas, I, 151. Garrison, F. J., II, 187, 218, 411. Garrison, W. L., I, 240, 345, 362; II, 45, 108, 187, 190. Gautier, Sefior, I, 325, 332. Gay, Willard, I, 298. Gayarre, Judge, II, 103. Geddes, Pres., II, 357. General Federation of Women's Clubs, I, 294, 295, 384; II, 18