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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Hays Gardiner or search for Hays Gardiner in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
desire to print in the reminiscences. the rough draft of my Battle Hymn, which they borrowed, with some difficulty, from Charlotte Whipple, who begged it of me, years ago. I hesitate to allow it, because it contains a verse which I discarded, as not up to the rest of the poem. It will undoubtedly be an additional attraction for the volume.... September 7. have attacked my proofs fiercely.... To Laura Oak Glen, September 16, 1899. yours received, tres chere. why not consult Hays Gardiner the late John Hays Gardiner, author of The Bible as literature, The forms of prose literature, and Harvard. about printing the original draft of the Hymn ? win's Edwin Arlington Robinson, author of Captain Craig, etc. opinion would be worth having, also. I think I shall consult E. E. Hale, albeit the two just named would be more fastidious. the facsimile printed in the reminiscences contains the discarded stanza. October 21. my last moments in this dear place. The past s
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
was duly packed, transported, and eaten — we are bound to say without ill effect. This recalls the day when, leaving Gardiner, she was presented with a packet of sandwiches, and charged to have the Pullman porter bring her a cup of bouillon. Theast verse might trouble them, but it did not. November 19. Was busy trying to arrange bills and papers so as to go to Gardiner to-morrow with my Richards son-in-law, when in the late afternoon Rosalind told me that dear noble Ednah Cheney had dieher much trouble. She takes it to pieces and rewrites it, and afterwards is much depressed; no color in anything. from Gardiner she writes to Sanborn for the Horatian lines she wishes to quote. ( whenever, she said once to Colonel Higginson, I wantre is reason to believe, by many persons in many countries.) it is remembered that in these days when she was leaving Gardiner at the last moment she handed Laura i a note. It read, be sure to rub the knee thoroughly night and morning! why, sh
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 14: the sundown splendid and serene 1906-1907; aet. 87-88 (search)
. And again, It was given to me something as was my Battle Hymn. . . . October 25. Wrote to a very bumptious child, thirteen years old, who proffers me her friendship and correspondence, claiming to have written poems and magazine contributions praised by noted authors. I sent her back her letter, with three or four corrections and a little advice, kindly meant, but which may not be so taken... She will probably turn and rend me, but I really felt it might do her good. November 14. Gardiner. A good meditation. The sense of God in the universe seems to be an attribute of normal humanity. We cannot think of our own personal identity without at the same time imagining a greater self from which we derive. This idea may be crude and barbarous, great minds have done much to make it otherwise; Christ most of all with His doctrine of divine love, providence, and forgiveness. The idea of a life beyond this one seems also to appertain to normal humanity. We had best accept this gre
b. Freeman, Edward, I, 95, 134. Freeman, Mrs., Edward, I, 95, 134. Fremdenblatt, II, 19. French Revolution, I, 12. Fries, Wulf, I, 145. From the Oak to the Olive, I, 265, 269. Frothingham, Octavius, I, 304. Froude, J. A., I, 86. Fuller, Margaret, I, 69, 72, 87, 346; I, 76, 84, 85, 86, 142; II, 404, 405. Furness, W. H., I, 304. Gainsborough, Lady, nx, 6. Gallup, Charles, II, 310. Galveston, II, 279. Gambetta, Leon, II, 25. Garcia method, I, 43. Gardiner, I, 122, 163, 194, 337. Gardiner, J. H., II, 267. Gardner, Mrs., Jack, I, 70, 82, 150, 182, 192. Garfield, J. A., II, 69. Garibaldi, Giuseppe, II, 242. Garrett, Thomas, I, 151. Garrison, F. J., II, 187, 218, 411. Garrison, W. L., I, 240, 345, 362; II, 45, 108, 187, 190. Gautier, Sefior, I, 325, 332. Gay, Willard, I, 298. Gayarre, Judge, II, 103. Geddes, Pres., II, 357. General Federation of Women's Clubs, I, 294, 295, 384; II, 182, 195, 207, 379. Genev