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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. 6 0 Browse Search
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e slave wall could until recently be found there. He was a leading citizen in the home town of his progenitors and one of its principal benefactors, and was identified with many of its institutions. He married in Boston, 10 December 1872, Clara Gardner, daughter of George and Helen M. (Read) Gardner of Boston, who survives him, together with a son, Gorham Brooks of Boston, A. B. (Harvard, 1905), and two daughters, Helen, wife of Robert Wales Emmons of Boston, A. B. (Harvard, 1895), and RachGardner of Boston, who survives him, together with a son, Gorham Brooks of Boston, A. B. (Harvard, 1905), and two daughters, Helen, wife of Robert Wales Emmons of Boston, A. B. (Harvard, 1895), and Rachel, wife of James Jackson of Westwood, Mass., A. B. (Harvard, 1904), who is at present Treasurer and Receiver-General of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Funeral services for Mr. Brooks were held in King's Chapel, Boston, and his body was placed in the family tomb in Oak Grove Cemetery, Medford.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28., Medford and her Minute Men, April 19, 1775. (search)
ay well believe, as the chroniclers relate, that the repeated gun shots, the beating of drums and the ringing of bells echoed through the air a general alarm. Of the fifty-nine Minute Men who trooped up the road to Menotomy where Paul Revere had passed at midnight, nine bore the name of Tufts and five the name of Hall. The names of the entire company are recorded in A True Record of the Travels and Time of Service of the Company of Medford Under the Command of Isaac Hall in the Late Colonel Gardner's Regiment. We leave them, then, for a moment tramping along the road beyond the bridge at the Weirs, alert, determined, grasping their flintlocks in the firm grip of men certain of danger but uncertain at what corner of the road it may face them. The townspeople left behind did not idly leave the business of the day to the fifty-nine who had marched off. After daybreak the town was almost destitute of men, for unorganized volunteers, singly and in groups, took up their own hurrie