hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 5 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 11 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 63 results in 21 document sections:

1 2 3
f Miss., Corinth, Miss., March 25, 1862. * * * * * * * IV. Col. F. Gardner, C. S. Army, is assigned to the command of the cavalry brigade received from these headquarters. * * * * * * * VI. Brig. Gen. Franklin Gardner is assigned to duty with this army as commander of all t Cavalry pickets will also be established on the same flank by General Gardner, to act in concert as prescribed in General Orders, No. 5, frois assigned to the command of the cavalry of the forces. Brigadier-General Gardner, on being relieved by General Beall, will report to Generanding avails himself of this occasion to return his thanks to General Gardner for his services in the reorganization of the cavalry of this attery.  Withers' Division. First Brigade.Third Brigade. Brig. Gen. F. Gardner. Brig. Gen.------Jackson. 19th Alabama.17th Alabama. 22d hers commanding. First Brigade.Third Brigade. Brig. Gen. Frank. Gardner commanding.Brig. Gen. John K. Jackson commanding 19th Alabama.17t
th of over twenty thousand. On June 20th, Van Dorn was replaced by Major-General John P. McCown, who had commanded the Third Division, and he in turn by Major-General Price, on July 3d. The transfer of the Army of the Mississippi to Chattanooga at Confederate generals--no. 10 Louisiana Paul O. Hebert commanded the Army of Louisiana defending New Orleans. Louis Hebert, active commander in the Southwest. Thomas M. Scott, originally Colonel of the 12th regiment. Franklin Gardner, defender of Port Hudson against Banks in 1863. James P. Major led a Cavalry brigade in Louisiana. Edward Higgins, conspicuous at New Orleans in 1862. Henry H. Sibley, conspicuous leader in New Mexico. Albert G. Blanchard led a brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia. Zebulon York commanded a brigade. Allan Thomas led a brigade in the Army of Northern Virginia. the end of July, left the Army of the West in control of western Tennessee, and northern Mississippi. One di
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
Bate, William B., Feb. 23, 1864. Bowen, John S., May 25, 1863. Breckinridge, J. C., Apr. 14, 1862. Butler, M. C., Sept. 19, 1864. Cheatham, B. F., Mar. 10, 1862. Churchill, T. J., Mar. 17, 1865. Crittenden, G. B., Nov. 9, 1861. Cleburne, P. R., Dec. 13, 1862. Cobb, Howell, Sept. 9, 1863. Donelson, D. S., Jan. 17, 1863. Elzey, Arnold, Dec. 4, 1862. Fagan, James F., April 25, 1864. Field, Chas. W., Feb. 12, 1864. Forney, John H., Oct. 27, 1862. French, S. G., Aug. 31, 1862. Gardner, F., Dec. 13, 1862. Grimes, Bryan, Feb. 15, 1865. Gordon, John B., May 14, 1864. Heth, Henry, Oct. 10, 1862. Hindman, T. C., April 14, 1862. Hoke, Robert F., April 20, 1864. Huger, Benj., Oct. 7, 1861. Johnson, B. R., May 21, 1864. Johnson, Edward, Feb. 28, 1863. Jones, David R., Oct. 11, 1862. Jones, Samuel, Mar. 10, 1862. Kemper, J. L., Sept. 19, 1864. Kershaw, J. B., May 18, 1864. Lee, Fitzhugh, Aug. 3, 1863. Lee, G. W. Custis, Oct. 20, 1864. Lee, W. H. F., Apr. 23, 1864. L
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers who died of wounds. (search)
boroa, N. C., Jan. 6, 1863. Fuller, Sandford K.,1st Co. Mass. S. S.,Gettysburg, Pa.,July 18, 1863. Gaddes, Joseph, Sergt.,10th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. Gage, William H.,13th Mass. Inf.,July 1, 1863,Baltimore, Md., Aug. 20, 1863. Gage, William L.,14th Batt. Mass. L. A.– –Washington, D. C., July 14, 1864. Gale, George W.,13th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Harrisburg, Pa., Sept., 1862. Gallagher, Hugh,28th Mass. Inf.,– –James Island, S. C., June 13, 1862. Gardner, Franklin, Corp.,15th Mass. Inf.,– –Oct. 6, 1862. Gardner, Henry H.,18th Mass. Inf.,– –Near Falmouth, Va., Dec., 1862. Gardner, Richard L.,20th Mass. Inf.,– –May 16, 1864. Gardner, Sidney Name and rank.Command.When and Where Wounded.Date and Place of Death. Gardner, Sidney,18th Mass. Inf.,– –June 30, 1864. Gay, George H.,33d Mass. Inf.,Resaca, Ga.,Near Dallas, Ga., May 26, 1864. Gay, James,35th Mass. Inf.,– –Alexandria, Va., Sept. 29, 1864. Gaylord, Willia
re, Md., Nov. 13, 1864. Frost, Albert C.,15th Mass. Inf.,July 3, 1863,Gettysburg, Pa., Sept. 16, 1863. Frothingham, Gustavus, Corp.,1st Mass. H. A.,Petersburg, Va., June 16, 1864.Petersburg, Va., June 24, 1864. Fuchs, Moritz,16th Mass. Inf.,– –Petersburg, Va., June 18, 1864. Fuller, Morton, Corp.,43d Mass. Inf.,– –Goldsboroa, N. C., Jan. 6, 1863. Fuller, Sandford K.,1st Co. Mass. S. S.,Gettysburg, Pa.,July 18, 1863. Gaddes, Joseph, Sergt.,10th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,Wilderness, Va., May 5, 1864. Gage, William H.,13th Mass. Inf.,July 1, 1863,Baltimore, Md., Aug. 20, 1863. Gage, William L.,14th Batt. Mass. L. A.– –Washington, D. C., July 14, 1864. Gale, George W.,13th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Harrisburg, Pa., Sept., 1862. Gallagher, Hugh,28th Mass. Inf.,– –James Island, S. C., June 13, 1862. Gardner, Franklin, Corp.,15th Mass. Inf.,– –Oct. 6, 1862. Gardner, Henry H.,18th Mass. Inf.,– –Near Falmouth, Va., Dec., 1862. Gardner, Richard L.,20th Mass.
517 Gallagher, F., 517 Gallagher, Hugh, 456, 517 Gallagher, James, 64 Gallagher, John, 1st Mass. H. A., 364 Gallagher, John, 28th Mass. Inf., 517 Gallagher, Owen, 364 Galletly, F. A., 364 Galligan, James, 364 Galligan, Patrick, 517 Gallop, L. R., 364 Gamage, H. R., 364 Gambol, George, 364 Gambol, J. F., 492 Gammon, R. T., 517 Gamrell, C. S., 364 Gamwell, J. M., 364 Ganley, J. H., 364 Gantner, Eugene, 364 Gardner, David, 517 Gardner, Edward, 364 Gardner, Frank, 364 Gardner, Franklin, 456 Gardner, G. W., 126, 240 Gardner, H. H., 456 Gardner, Horace, 364 Gardner, R. L., 456 Gardner, Sidney, 457 Gardner, W. H., 517 Garey, Patrick, 364 Garfield, N. B., 364 Garibaldi, Giuseppe, 140 Garland, Wingate, 517 Garlick, E. A., 364 Garlick, R. A., 364 Garman, E., 517 Garnett, William, 517 Garrity, John, 364 Garside, Andrew, 517 Garvey, Andrew, 517 Garvey, John, 517 Gaskell, J. N., 364 Gaskin, George, 364 Gaskins, W. B., 364 Gassett, T. R., 364 Gatchell,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
tter to Foster, June 21st, stated that the secretary of war approved his suggestion, and had ordered an equal number of Confederate generals and field officers to be forwarded to be treated precisely as the Federal prisoners were, and with proper precautions to prevent escape, putting them in irons, if necessary, for that purpose. The first roll of Confederate prisoners of war made out for this purpose was from those confined at Fort Delaware, and included Maj.-Gens. Edward Johnson and Franklin Gardner, Brig.-Gens. J. J. Archer, G. H. Steuart and M. Jeff Thompson, and 46 colonels, lieutenant-colonels and majors. General Jones, on July 1st, proposed to General Foster that they should exchange prisoners, if the respective governments approved, and enclosed communications from Brigadier-Generals Wessells, Seymour Scammon, Heckman and Shaler, the Federal general officers in his hands, in which they declared that a prompt exchange of prisoners, if an exchange were to be made, was calle
eld by a force of 10,000 or 15,000 men. Being a civilian soldier, Banks wore rose-colored glasses. He already was hoping, himself, to move against Port Hudson as soon as the troops in the city could be consolidated with the fleet. At this early stage Banks was clearly a convert to the power of floating batteries. About the time that Banks was sailing from New York to New Orleans there had been considerable Confederate activity in the shifting about of commanders in Louisiana. Maj.-Gen. Franklin Gardner was ordered to make Port Hudson impregnable; General Ruggles was charged with the duty of pushing-forward its new works, these being by all accounts already formidable. Earl Van Dorn was still at Vicksburg although Pemberton, at Jackson, Miss., was soon to be within its walls. Sibley had already come down from Opelousas, with his newest headquarters for the time at New Iberia; Lieut.-Gen. E. Kirby Smith's command had been broadened to embrace the TransMis-sissippi department, an
's brigade held the Confederate front toward Opelousas. (Federal reports.) After the collapse of Banks' expedition up the river, Richard Taylor was appointed by President Davis to the command of the department of Alabama, Mississippi and East Louisiana. This department included the district of the Gulf, Maj.-Gen. Dabney H. Maury; district of North Alabama, Brig.-Gen. P. D. Roddey; district of Central Alabama, Brig.-Gen. D. W. Adams; district of Mississippi and East Louisiana, Maj.-Gen. Franklin Gardner; the fortified city of Mobile on the south, and the invincible remnant of the cavalry corps of N. B. Forrest on the north. The return for his department November 20, 1864, shows the following Louisiana troops included: In Maury's command—Twenty-second regiment infantry, brigade of Gen. Alpheus Baker. In Gardners command, brigade of Gen. George B. Hodge-First cavalry, Col. John S. Scott; Third cavalry; Col. Daniel Gober's mounted infantry; Maj. Frederick N. Ogden's cavalry battali
862, in Knoxville, Tenn., in his 36th year. Major-General Franklin Gardner Major-General Franklin Gardner was born in Major-General Franklin Gardner was born in New York in 1823. His family moved West and he was appointed to the United States military academy from Iowa in 1839. Afted them to espouse. Thus, with the purest of motives, Franklin Gardner left the service of the old army and entered that of oh General Beauregard expressed his appreciation of Gen. Franklin Gardner in the following language: The general commanding avails himself of this occasion to return his thanks to General Gardner for his services in the reorganization of the cavalry brilliant page of the Confederate history. The heroism of Gardner and his men is not dimmed by the fact that they were finalns that were brought against them. After his exchange General Gardner was assigned to duty in Mississippi, at the last under the orders of Gen. Richard Taylor. After the war General Gardner lived in Louisiana the quiet life of a planter, near Vermi
1 2 3