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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
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ted, Feb. 27, 1807, under the name of West Cambridge, Mass. Spec. Laws, IV. 88. which name was changed to Arlington, April 20, 1867. Ibid., XII. 244. The inhabitants of the territory left on the south side of Charles River petitioned to be made a separate precinct, as early as 1748, and renewed their petition, from time to time, until April 2, 1779, when they were authorized to bring in a bill to incorporate them as an ecclesiastical parish, excepting Samuel Sparhawk, John Gardner, Joanna Gardner, and Moses Griggs, and their estates. Mass. Prov. Rec., XXXIX. 213. This was styled the Third Parish, or Little Cambridge. The whole territory south of Charles River was incorporated, under the name of Brighton, Feb. 24, 1837. Mass. Spec. Laws, IV. 70. By an act approved May 21, 1873, Brighton was annexed to Boston,—the annexation to take full effect on the first Monday in January, 1874. By the incorporation of West Cambridge and Brighton, which was the result of an amicable agre
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
t the same fate. At last, nearly half a century after the commencement of regular religious services (for the winter), and about thirty-five years after the erection of a meeting-house in which public worship was offered throughout the year, the inhabitants on the south side of the river were incorporated by the General Court, April, 1779, as a separate precinct with authority to settle a minister, and to provide for his support by a parish tax,— excepting Samuel Sparhawk, John Gardner, Joanna Gardner, and Moses Griggs, and their estates, who shall be exempted from all ministerial taxes to said precinct, so long as they shall live or reside within the same, or until they or either of them shall give their hands into the Secretary's Office of this State, desiring that they with their estates may be considered as part of said precinct. The subsequent proceedings are related by Dr. Holmes in Coll. Mass. Hist. Soc., VII., 36, 37: In 1780, the church members on the south side of Charles