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imes. Col. L. J. Gartrell, of Georgia, was slightly wounded, and his son severely, and it is believed the latter has since died. Captain Clarke, of Carroll county, Georgia, was severely wounded, and Captain Wilson, of the same State, slightly wounded in the heel. The Dawson (Greene county, Ga.,) Company was very slightly engaged in the fight. General reports state that the Eighth Regiment of Georgia Volunteers suffered very severely in killed and wounded. Lieut. Col. Montgomery Gardner (formerly of the U. S. Army, and attached to the First Independent Regiment of Ga., of which Gen. Bartow was previously Colonel,) was slightly wounded in the leg, and had his horse shot from under him. The wounded in Richmond that I visited on yesterday, express their heartfelt thanks for the God-like kindness which they are receiving at the hands of the families where they are located. There are thousands and tens of thousands and hundreds of thousands of Georgians, and re
le for the right, and despite of odds, regiment after regiment threw itself in the way, disputing the ground, inch by inch, regardless of the fact that its predecessors had been cut to pieces or dispersed. A battery harassing our lines, the 8th Georgia Regiment was ordered to take it, and right well did they do so; but a myriad of Yankees seemed to rise up, who had been hitherto concealed, and pouring in their fire upon our column, it seemed to melt away like snow beneath a summer's sun. Col. Gardner was here shot down and was taken prisoner, but afterwards retaken by our men later in the day. The 8th, compelled to retreat with nearly half its number wounded or killed, the attack of the enemy was met by the Brigade of Gen. Bee, composed of Mississippians and Alabamians, and one regiment, I think, of Tennesseans. Later in the day, Col. Bartow was shot near this spot, whilst leading on the 7th Georgia Regiment, commanded by Col. Gartrell Gen. Bee's Brigade could not withstand the
for the Dispatch by a gentleman who participated in the fierce conflict of the 21st of July: Eighth Georgia Regiment. On Thursday, the 18th inst., about 2 P. M., this Regiment left Winchester for Manassas, under command of Lieut. Colonel Montgomery Gardner. Colonel Bartow had been for some weeks acting Brigadier General of a Brigade, consisting of the 7th, 8th, 9th, and 21th Georgia Regiments, and a battalion of Kentuckians. The 8th marched 27 miles over the mountains, fording thtoons melted away as if by magic. Cool, unflinching and stubborn, each man fought with gallantry, and a stern determination to win or die. Not one faltered. Col. Bartow's horse was shot under him. Adjutant Branch fell, mortally wounded. Lieut. Col. Gardner dropped with a shattered leg. The officers moved from rank to rank, from man to man, cheering and encouraging the brave fellows. Some of them took the muskets of the dead and began coolly firing at the enemy. It was an appalling hour
Arrival of Col. Gardner. Augusta, Ga. Oct. 11. --Col. Montgomery Gardner, of the 8th Georgia regiment, who was so dreadfully wounded at the battle of Manassa Plains, on the 21st of July, reached here on yesterday in an ambulance car. He stood the trip remarkably well, and is now quite comfortable. Arrival of Col. Gardner. Augusta, Ga. Oct. 11. --Col. Montgomery Gardner, of the 8th Georgia regiment, who was so dreadfully wounded at the battle of Manassa Plains, on the 21st of July, reached here on yesterday in an ambulance car. He stood the trip remarkably well, and is now quite comfortable.