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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 8 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 6 0 Browse Search
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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Old portraits and modern Sketches (search)
were desirous of returning to their native country as missionaries. In one instance he borrowed, on his own responsibility, the sum requisite to secure the freedom of a slave in whom he became interested. One of his theological pupils was Newport Gardner, who, twenty years after the death of his kind patron, left Boston as a missionary to Africa. He was a native African, and was held by Captain Gardner, of Newport, who allowed him to labor for his own benefit, whenever by extra diligence hCaptain Gardner, of Newport, who allowed him to labor for his own benefit, whenever by extra diligence he could gain a little time for that purpose. The poor fellow was in the habit of laying up his small earnings on these occasions, in the faint hope of one day obtaining thereby the freedom of himself and his family. But time passed on, and the hoard of purchase-money still looked sadly small. He concluded to try the efficacy of praying. Having gained a day for himself, by severe labor, and communicating his plan only to Dr. Hopkins and two or three other Christian friends, he shut himself u
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Historical papers (search)
beginning with Portsmouth, was abandoned. They had still a sufficient force for the surprise of a single settlement; and Haverhill, on the Merrimac, was selected for conquest. In the mean time, intelligence of the expedition, greatly exaggerated in point of numbers and object, had reached Boston, and Governor Dudley had despatched troops to the more exposed out posts of the Provinces of Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Forty men, under the command of Major Turner and Captains Price and Gardner, were stationed at Haverhill in the different garrison-houses. At first a good degree of vigilance was manifested; but, as days and weeks passed without any alarm, the inhabitants relapsed into their old habits; and some even began to believe that the rumored descent of the Indians was only a pretext for quartering upon them two score of lazy, rollicking soldiers, who certainly seemed more expert in making love to their daughters, and drinking their best ale and cider, than in patrolling t
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30., A New ship, a New colony, and a New church. (search)
ficates of dismission and recommendation, into a distinct body. Their names are as follows: John Selmar Nubia Newport Gardner Robert Wainwood Eusebia Wainwood Phillis Fitch Harriet Moett Diana Harris Mary Anna Five othersh out her hands unto God. It having been reported to the Council that the infant church had made unanimous choice of Newport Gardner and John Selmar Nubia as deacons, the fellowship of the church was expressed to them by Rev. Mr. Edwards and the closing prayer by Rev. Mr. Green. An anthem arranged by Deacon Gardner was then sung. The Christian Watchman of December 30 (Baptist weekly) gives the same account, with this addition,— A Congregational Church and all the exercises were appropriaof thanks of these colonists for the courteous and generous treatment by the Boston people. This was signed by Dea. Newport Gardner. What this treatment was will be seen in the society's report of 1826:— At the monthly concert the subject was