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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 8 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 4 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. A. Garfield or search for J. A. Garfield in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 3 document sections:

ng is a detailed account of the battle between Colonel Garfield and General Marshall, in which the latter was e of his trains. Immediately on our arrival Colonel Garfield, learning of the position of the aforesaid cav but two in killed, and one wounded. Meanwhile Colonel Garfield, with his command, having tarried a short timeo orders, returned to Guyandotte. On the 9th, Colonel Garfield determining on a pursuit of the enemy, detaile command at the camp, received a dispatch from Colonel Garfield stating that he had found the enemy, and askine day they eagerly pressed their weary way. As Colonel Garfield had stated, he had found the enemy two miles fe formidable position and number of the enemy, Colonel Garfield not fully aware of their exact locality, sent he right of the creek, north of his main body, Colonel Garfield despatched a force of about a hundred men acro A force of two hundred was then thrown out by Colonel Garfield for the ascent of the lower horn of the cresce
Doc. 11.-battle of Middle Creek, Ky. Col. Garfield's despatch. headquarters Eighteenth bing. Very truly your obedient servant, J. A. Garfield, Colonel Commanding Brigade. W. H. Clapp the cavalry skirmish at the latter place, Col. Garfield pushed on with the advance of his brigade e advance was less than seven hundred, but Col. Garfield at once prepared to make an attack. A b they knew the nature of the ground. Said Col. Garfield: Go in, boys; give them--Hail Columbia! the double quick. As soon as he saw them, Col. Garfield pulled off his coat and flung it up in theith a wild shout, and rushed at the enemy, Col. Garfield, in his shirt-sleeves, leading the way. ley is effectually cleared of rebels. Colonel Garfield's address. The following address to thitizens of the Sandy Valley, was issued by Col. Garfield, after he had driven off Humphrey Marshallbetter days of the Republic soon return: (Signed) J. A. Garfield, Colonel Commanding Brigade. [2 more...]
Piketon, March 19, 1862. For some time it has been known to Gen. Garfield that an irregularly organized body of rebels, amounting to some o'clock on Saturday night. Several circumstances now modified General Garfield's preconceived plan of attack, but without hesitation he sent uilt. Conceiving the rebels about to make a permanent stand, Gen. Garfield drew up his line in front of them, with his right resting on thng back into the woods. Fearing the results of a loss of time, Gen. Garfield immediately ordered his men forward to scale the hill, and, if iscuous articles of personal property. There being no means at Gen. Garfield's disposal, by which any part of this vast quantity of effects ce of nearly nine hundred, all under the direct command of Brigadier-Gen. Garfield. We started on Friday, the thirteenth instant, and after nd under Col. Cranor, of the Fortieth Ohio, and the third under Gen. Garfield. The cavalry took the main road, or old State road, as it is c