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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 3 1 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 2 0 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 1: discontinuance of the guide-board (search)
ate-prison, as he should; the seed of the righteous is often seen begging bread. We have to read very carefully between the lines if we would fully recognize the joy of Marcellus exiled, the secret ennui of Caesar with a senate at his heels. Thus it is in daily life — that is, in nature; and yet many still think it a defect in a story if it leaves a single moral influence to be worked out by the meditation of the reader. On my lending to an intelligent young woman, the other day, Mr. Hamlin Garland's remarkable volume, Main-travelled roads, she returned it with the remark that she greatly admired all the stories except the first, which seemed to her immoral. It closed, indeed, as she justly pointed out, with a striking scene in which a long-absent lover carries off the wife and child of a successful but unworthy rival, and the tale ends with the words: The sun shone on the dazzling, rustling wheat; the fathomless sky as a sea bent over them, and the world lay before them. But w
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 8: local fiction (search)
ore easily drawn, though not necessarily or always the most worth drawing. Hence we are acquiring a gallery of rustic groups spread over the continent, while the traditions of polish and refinement are ignored either for want of personal experience or of skill. Unluckily, the writer who has succeeded with village life always wishes to deal with more artificial society. It is as inevitable as the yearning of every good amateur comedian to act Shakespeare. Bret Harte and his successor, Hamlin Garland, handle admirably the types they knew in early life, but the moment they attempt to delineate a highly bred woman the curtain rises on a creaking doll in starched petticoats. Few, indeed, of our authors can venture to portray, what would seem not so impossible, an every-day gentleman or lady. But Miss Jewett can produce types of the old New England gentry, dwelling perhaps in the quietest of country towns, yet incapable of any act which is not dignified or gracious; and Miss Viola Ros
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 9: the Western influence (search)
expression in literature. Howells can never represent it; he came East too soon and too reverentially. But we find it in a book like Main-Travelled Roads by Hamlin Garland, where the vigor of characterization carries one away from the first moment to the last, and the figures seem absolutely real. Mr. Garland's pictures of lifeMr. Garland's pictures of life in the middle West are sombre, but not morbid. In one respect his work and that of Frank Norris present an odd paradox. Each of these writers set out with the stated intention of breaking away from the literary traditions of the East. They did, so far as the Eastern states of North America are concerned; but they did not hesitate to go still farther east, to France and Russia, for their-models. Mr. Garland's earlier tales have much of the ironical compactness of de Maupassant, and Mr. Norris's novels could not have been written but by a worshiper of Zola. It cannot be expected that the spirit of the West will find perfect expression under such a metho
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
55, 56-65, 108, 117, 221. Franklin, James, 58. Franks, Rebecca, 53, 80, 81. Fraser's magazine, 95, 261. Fredericksburg sonnet, Aldrich's, 264. Freneau, Philip, 36-39. Fuller, H. B., 255. Fuller (Ossoli), Margaret, 179, 180, 232. Garland, Hamlin, 254. Garrison, William Lloyd, 124, 148, 151. Godwin, William, 67, 72. Golden legend, Longfellow's, 144. Goodrich, Samuel G., 190. Griswold, Rufus W., 54, 105, 208, 210. Halleck, Fitz-Greene, 104. Hamlet, 243, 272, 279. Hancock, 126, 133, 135, 137, 146, 152, 153, 160-166, 178, 192-197, 216, 242, 264. MacBETHeth, 279. McFingal, Trumbull's, 41. Madison, James, 38. Magazines, New England, 131-133. Alagnalia Christi Americana, Mather's, 17. Main-Travelled Roads, Garland's, 254. Malvern Hill, Battle of, 217. Marble Faun, Hawthorne's, 185. Marennes, Billaud de, 82. Marie Antoinette, 80. Mark Twain, 236, 245, 246-247. Marmion, Scott's, 37. Marshes of Glynn, Lanier's, 264. Massachusetts to Vi
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
presentative in its idiom and as intellectual as the occasion might demand, is not surprising. Investigation has shown that of Bret Harte's three hundred dialect words and phrases a mere handful remain unidentified as American. The term Western, however, usually has reference not to the Pacific slope but to the Middle West and South-west. The Western dialect is currently understood to be the dialect found in the writings of Mark Twain, See Book III, Chap. VIII. Edward Eggleston, Hamlin Garland, See Book III, Chap. VI. Owen Wister, and James Whitcomb Riley. See Book III, Chap. X. But this dialect is also composite. The original sources are chiefly New England and the South, with a mingling here and there of German and Scandinavian elements. Thus the pioneer dialect of Southern Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois was mainly Southern, while the northern portions of these States reflect the New England influence. The speech of Nebraska shows the influence of Swedish and Pennsyl
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
dler Harris; Flute and violin, James Lane Allen; Otto the Knight, Octave Thanet (Alice French); Main-Travelled Roads, Hamlin Garland; Gallegher, and other stories, Richard Harding Davis; Fourteen to one, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps; Huckleberries gathere the veritists of the nineties who told what they considered to be the unidealized truth concerning the life they knew,— Garland, Miss Wilkins, Frank Norris, See also Book III, Chap. XI. and the rest. This third group approached its task scientifically, stated its doctrines with clearness,—as for example in Hamlin Garland's Crumbling Idols,—and then proceeded to work out its careful pictures with deliberate art. Garland's Main-Travelled Roads, stories of the settlement period of the MiddleGarland's Main-Travelled Roads, stories of the settlement period of the Middle Border, have no golden light upon them. They tell the truth with brutal directness and they tell it with an art that convinces. They are not mere stories; they are living documents in the history of the West. So with the Maupassant-like pictures<
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
oward, 197 Furness, William Henry, 197, 211 Future of the American negro, the, 325 Gabriel Conroy, 380, 387 Gachard, L. P., 138 Gales, 181 Gallatin, Albert, 89 Gallegher and other stories, 388, 392 Garfield, James A., 220 Garland, Hamlin, 363, 388, 390 Garland, the, 174 Garrison, William Lloyd, 44, 50, 51, 188, 189, 193 Garrison of Cape Anne, the, 48 Gayangos, Pascal de, 127 Gazette (Boston), 178 Gazette (Cincinnati), 184 Gazette (Haverhill), 45 GazetGarland, the, 174 Garrison, William Lloyd, 44, 50, 51, 188, 189, 193 Garrison of Cape Anne, the, 48 Gayangos, Pascal de, 127 Gazette (Boston), 178 Gazette (Cincinnati), 184 Gazette (Haverhill), 45 Gazette (Salem), 177 Gazette (Washington), 182 Gazette of the United States, the, 180, 181 Gem of the Season, the, 174 Gentleman's magazine, the, 149, 161 George III, 142 George Eliot. See Cross, Marian Evans George Selwyn (Walt Whitman), 263 n. Georgia scenes, 153, 347, 389 Georgia sketches, 389 Georgia volunteer, the, 306-307 Geschichte der Colonisation von New England, 136 Gettysburg, 276, 284 Gettysburg address, 256 Gibbons, James Sloan, 281 Gibbons
ston wrote The Hoosier schoolmaster and The Circuit rider, faithful and moving presentations of genuine pioneer types which were destined to pass with the frontier settlements. Soon James Whitcomb Riley was to sing of the next generation of Hoosiers, who frequented The Old Swimmina Hole and rejoiced When the Frost is on the Punkin. It was the era of Denman Thompson's plays, Joshua Whitcomb and The Old homestead. Both the homely and the exotic marched under this banner of local color: Hamlin Garland presented Iowa barnyards and cornfields, Helen Hunt Jackson dreamed the romance of the Mission Indian in Ramona, and Lafcadio Hearn, Irish and Greek by blood, resident of New Orleans and not yet an adopted citizen of Japan, tantalized American readers with his Chinese Ghosts and Chita. A fascinating period it seems, as one looks back upon it, and it lasted until about the end of the century, when the suddenly discovered commercial value of the historical novel and the ensuing competitio
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
fornia, that thus early established in the upper Mississippi valley the realistic tradition which descends unbroken through the work of Eggleston, E. W. Howe, Hamlin Garland, and Edgar Lee Masters. From the Middle West, too, came the principal exponent of native realism, in himself almost an entire literary movement, almost an aers of the national optimism. Howe's early experiment was followed, not imitated, by a brilliant group of writers undoubtedly nearer to Zola than to Howells: Hamlin Garland, See Book III, Chap. VI. best in short stories, who stressed the sordid facts of Middle Western farm life and who spoke for the group in his volume of ess much material of interest relating to the educational experience of the two brothers. Howells, Ibid., Chap. XI. Aldrich, Ibid., Chaps. VI, VII, and X. and Hamlin Garland Ibid., Chap. VI. in their autobiographical volumes adorn the schoolday tales of their youth with the grace of the life of the imagination; but no Kipling dra
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
581 Furman, Gabriel, 179 Furness, Grace L., 280 Furness, H. H., 483 Furness, H. H., Jr., 483 Furness, W. L., 472 Furstenwarther, 578 Fyles, Franklin, 266, 280 Gaine, Hugh, 538 Gaius, 462 Galaxy, the, 103, 160, 314 Galdos, 81 Gale, S., 429 Gall, 578 Gallatin, 430, 438 Galloper, the, 288 Galsworthy, John, 293 Galton, 422 Gambles, the, 287 Game of love and other plays, a, 581 Garces, 138 Garcia, 450 Garfield, James A., 410, 414 Garland, Hamlin, 76, 92, 419 Garreau, 592, 593 Garrick, David, 186, 487, 539 Garrison, W. L., 344, 415 Gaskell, Mrs., 70 Gaston de Saint-Elme, 592 Gates, Eleanor, 292 Gates of the East, the, 163 Gavarni, 100 Gay, 327 Gayarre, C. E. A., 592, 593, 594, 597 Gayley, 423 Gaylor, Charles, 272 Gedichte (Drescher), 581 Gedichte und Erzahlungen, 58 Geistinger, Marie, 587, 588 General introduction to the Old Testament, 207 General Theological Seminary, 50 Genetic t
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