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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 1: the Ante-bellum life of the author. (search)
ly a few miles off. About one o'clock we halted to fill the canteens, and marched to meet the enemy. The columns were deployed, --Fifth Infantry on the right, Ringgold's battery, Third Infantry, a two-gun battery of eighteen-pounders, the Fourth Infantry, battalion of artillery acting as infantry, Duncan's field battery and Eighth Infantry, Captains Charles May and Croghan Ker, with squadrons of dragoons, looking to the trains; the Third and Fourth Infantry, the Third Brigade, under Colonel John Garland. That brigade, with the Fifth Regiment, the heavy guns, and Ringgold's, were of the right wing, General Twiggs commanding. Other forces of the left were under Colonel William G. Belknap, Eighth Infantry, and Duncan's Battery. As the lines deployed, Lieutenant J. E. Blake, of the Topographical Engineers, dashed forward alone, made a close inspection of the enemy's line with such lightning speed that his work was accomplished before the enemy could comprehend his purpose, rode bac
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
what men may look for in the way of fame. It was towards the last of the fighting, at the time when our troops took by assault the works immediately round the City of Mexico. Grant was regimental quartermaster of the regiment commanded by Colonel Garland; and, it appears, at the attack on the Campo Santo, he, with about a dozen men, got round the enemy's flank and was first in the work. Somewhat after, he came to the then Lieutenant Hunt and said: Didn't you see me go first into that work the other day? Why, no, said Hunt, it so happened I did not see you, though I don't doubt you were in first. Well, replied Grant, I was in first, and here Colonel Garland has made no mention of me! The war is nearly done; so there goes the last chance I ever shall have of military distinction! The next time, but one, that Hunt saw him, was at Culpeper, just after he was made Lieutenant-General. Well, sir! cried our Chief-of-Artillery, I am glad to find you with some chance yet left for mili
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
ote, 212. Fessenden, Francis, 248. Fessenden, William Pitt, 249, 259. Field, Charles W., 360. Fitzhugh, Norman R., 286. Flag of truce, 149, 170. Flint, Edward A., 278, 311. Forbes's naked-eyed Medusa, 226. Forsyth, James William, 357. Fort Fisher, 316. Fort Harrison, 281. Fort Stedman, 323. Fort Wadsworth, 249. Freikle, —, 287. French, William Henry, 26, 52, 53, 60, 80; described, 10; at Kelly's Ford, 43; failure to connect, 54; rage of, 57. Freeman's Bridge, 294. Garland, John, 313. Garrett's Tavern, 121. Gatineau, —, 262. General, and details of movements, 214. Germanna Ford, 86. Germans, poor showing, 131, 207, 214, 277, 285. Getty, George Washington, 88, 89, 91, 92, 94, 300. Gettysburg, battle of, 7. Gibbon, John, 92, 103, 134, 147, 291, 329, 338; described, 107, 268; on Jericho, 135. Girardey, Victor J. B., 216. Globe Tavern, 219, 233, 234. Graham, William Montrose, 16. Grant, Lewis Addison, 175. Grant, Ulysses Simpson, 87, 93, 123,
, 1865. DeRussey, R. E., Mar. 13, 1865. De Russy, G. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Dimick, Justin, Mar. 13, 1865. Drum, Rich. C., Mar. 13, 1865. Duane, Jas. C., Mar. 13, 1865. Duncan, Thos., Mar. 13, 1865. Dunn, W. McK., Mar. 13, 1865. Eastman, Seth, Aug. 9, 1866. Eaton, Joseph H., Mar. 13, 1865. Ekin, James A., Mar. 13, 1865. Finley, Clement, Mar. 13, 1865. Fitzhugh, C. L., Mar. 13, 1865. Forsyth, Jas. W., April 9, 1865. Fry, Cary H., Oct. 15, 1867. Gardner, John L., Mar. 13, 1865. Garland, John, Aug. 20, 1847. Gates, Wm., Mar. 13, 1865. Graham, L. P., Mar. 13, 1865. Graham, W. M., Mar. 13, 1865. Greene, James D., Mar. 13, 1865. Greene, Oliver D., Mar. 13, 1865. Grier, Wm. N., Mar. 13, 1865. Hagner, Peter V., Mar. 13, 1865. Haines, Thos. J., Mar. 13, 1865. Hardin, M. D., Mar. 13, 1865. Haskin, Jos. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Hayden, Julius, Mar. 13, 1865. Hays, William, Mar. 13, 1865. Hill, Bennett H., Jan. 31, 1865. Holabird, S. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Hunt, Lewis C., Mar. 13
List of Visitors to West point. --1. John J. Crittenden, Frankfort, Ky.; 2. Andrew Johnson, Greenville, Tenn.; 3. Edward D. Bell, Salem, Oregon; 4. John M. Botts, Richmond, Va.; 5. David Davis, Bloomington, III.; 6. David Cooper, St. Paul, Minnesota; 7. John Woodruff, New Haven, Conn,; 8. James S. Albans, Wisconsin; 9. Frederick P. Stanton, Kansas; 10. Alexander Cummings, Penn.; 11. Thomas J. McKean, Lowa; 12. Richard Tilghman, Maryland; 13. James G. Blaine, Maine; 14. Herman Haunt, Deerfield, Mass.; 15. Professor Charles Davis, N.Y.; 16.Gen. H. B. Carrington, Ohio; 17. Brig. Gen. John Garland, U.S. Army.
J. H. Burch & Co., and H. J. Tinkham & Co., both heavy banking firms in Chicago, have succumbed to the currency panic and assigned. They both failed from losses on Illinois currency, which they were unable to carry. The New York papers say that the Central Park as yet attracts but few visitors. The Express thinks that war is the cause. The New York Young Men's Christian Association have entered the field and propose to supply the religious wants of the volunteers. The French vineyards are nearly ruined for this year. The clarets and sauternes will scarcely be a fraction of the usual yield. The mercantile hypocrites of Boston, Mass., are getting up a petition praying Congress to pass a law for the emancipation of slaves. Camp Cairo presents a sick list of seven hundred and twenty-two. Brigadier General Garland, U. S. A., died in New York last Monday.
The late General Garland. --Brevet Brigadier General John Garland, who died in New York on the 6th instant, was in the 66th year of his age. Few officers of the United States Army have seen as much service as General Garland. Entering the army from Virginia in the war of 1812, he served on the Indian frontier, afterwards in Brevet Brigadier General John Garland, who died in New York on the 6th instant, was in the 66th year of his age. Few officers of the United States Army have seen as much service as General Garland. Entering the army from Virginia in the war of 1812, he served on the Indian frontier, afterwards in Florida, and led his command, the fourth infantry, in every battle fought in Mexico, save that of Buena Vista, , was in the 66th year of his age. Few officers of the United States Army have seen as much service as General Garland. Entering the army from Virginia in the war of 1812, he served on the Indian frontier, afterwards in Florida, and led his command, the fourth infantry, in every battle fought in Mexico, save that of Buena Vista,