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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 5: Seven Pines or fair Oaks (search)
relieved on the Charles City road, and hurried to join the other three brigades under Hill, who had fretted greatly under the delay. He started his two brigades on the left of the road as soon as he saw Rodes approaching. The formation was Garland's brigade on the left of the road, followed by G. B. Anderson; Rodes's brigade on the right, followed by Rains. Each brigade marched in column until the enemy were met, when it formed line. The rear brigades formed about 300 yards behind the ly's flank, and have had similar chances. The other three brigades reported their strength and losses as follows:— Seven Pines, May 31, 1862 POSITIONBRIGADEPRESENTKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGtotalPERCENT Front rightRodes22002418535109950 Front leftGarland2065986004274037 Rear leftAnderson, G. B.18651496803786647 6130488213384270544 This record shows great fighting power, and will compare favorably for a half-day's fighting of an equal body of men, with any records of the war. At Waterlo
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 7 (search)
fresh brigades, French's and Meagher's, were en route to him, but were yet too far off to lend any aid. But Lee, at last, was putting forth his whole strength. He issued orders for an advance of every command, regardless of the troops upon its right or left. A general advance was made, not simultaneous in its beginnings, but pressed to success by Whiting's two brigades supported by Longstreet on our extreme right, by Lawton's and Winder's brigades in the centre, and by D. H. Hill with Garland's and parts of Ripley's and Rodes's brigades upon our left. Had it been made two hours earlier, the fruits of the victory would have been important. As it was, they were so trifling as scarcely to be worth mention. Porter fell back in fairly good order under cover of his superior artillery, and our artillery could not be gotten forward across the swamps. Blessed night, for which the defeated pray, had let down her mantle while the firing was still severe, and before we could even feel
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 8 (search)
uld do all the fighting. Jackson's troops (his own and Ewell's divisions) had had a sharp campaign in the Valley, but the rest of the army at Yorktown, Williamsburg, and Seven Pines had suffered just as many hardships, and done even more severe fighting, as the casualties will attest. There were no arrears to be made up. The total killed and wounded of Jackson's six brigades in the Valley campaign from Kernstown (March 23) to Port Republic (June 9) were but 2311. Three brigades—Rodes's, Garland's, and G. B. Anderson's of D. H. Hill's division—had had killed and wounded the first day at Seven Pines 2621. During the Seven Days they lost 2277 more, while Jackson's six brigades lost but 1152. It is only natural and right that every division commander should feel both pity and affection for his own men, but to manifest either by shirking battle is no real kindness to them, apart from the tremendous consequences to the army and the nation. We may now return to Lee, Longstreet, an
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 9 (search)
n to advance. This, as near as I could judge, was about an hour and a half before sundown. . . . The division fought heroically and well, but fought in vain. Garland, in my immediate front, showed all his wonted courage and enthusiasm, but he needed and asked for reenforcements. I sent Lt.-Col. Newton, 6th Ga., to his support, and, observing a brigade by a fence in our rear, I galloped back to it and found it to be that of Gen. Toombs. I ordered it forward to support Garland, and accompanied it. The brigade advanced handsomely to the brow of the hill, but soon retreated in disorder. Gordon, commanding Rodes's brigade, pushed gallantly forward and gais's, Colquitt's, and Ripley's brigades of D. H. Hill's division, the casualties were making 889, a total, so far, of 5111. The other two brigades, Anderson's and Garland's, report only their total casualties for the campaign as 863 and 844, a total of 1707. A half, 854, is a moderate estimate for their losses at Malvern. This w
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
A. P.Branch, Archer, Gregg, Pender, Field, Thomas7 JacksonWinder, Jones, J. K., Taliaferro, Starke6 Hill, D. H.Ripley, Garland, Rodes, Anderson, G. B. Colquitt4 Total 2d Corps4 Divisions19 Brigades, 24 Batteries, 100 Guns24 ArtilleryPendletonPens connected both with the main pike. On the right Garland's brigade had been attacked at 7 A. M. by a superior force; Gen. Garland, an officer of great promise, had been killed, and his brigade driven back in confusion, but the enemy did not follow which reports: killed 61, wounded 151, missing 204, total 522. It was most severely engaged of any, except, possibly, Garland's, which was routed when he was killed. Garland's losses for the whole campaign are given as: killed 86, wounded 440, tGarland's losses for the whole campaign are given as: killed 86, wounded 440, total 526. Livermore's Numbers and losses in the civil War estimates the totals for the two armies at South Mountain, as follows:— force ENGAGEDKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL Confederates17,85232515608002685 Federals28,480325140385183
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 13: Sharpsburg or Antietam (search)
ll had had near at hand and in reserve,— Colquitt's, Ripley's, and Garland's, the last now under MacRae. On Hood's left, Lee had sent Walkernk of Hood's attack, and these brigades (Colquitt's, Ripley's, and Garland's) had remained holding advanced ground about the Roulette house, ile, but their front was narrow and on its exposed right flank was Garland's brigade, which, on the 14th, had been routed and badly cut up at Turner's Gap. Hill reports:— Garland's brigade (Col. MacRae commanding), had been much demoralized by the fight on South Mountain, but rs in Colquitt's brigade, which had fought after the giving way of Garland's brigade until its ranks were nearly mingled with the enemy's, fo17287 Total16951417700 D. H. Hill's Div. Ripley110506124740 Garland46210187443 Rodes111289225625 Anderson64299202565 Colquitt1295rlow, and Tyndale. Among the Confederate generals were, killed: Garland, G. B. Anderson, Branch, Starke, and Douglas. Among the wounded w