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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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to use these forces in an attack upon the Valley for the purpose of seizing, fortifying and holding Winchester, and thus dominating all of northeastern Virginia, and at the same time threatening Johnston's position at Manassas. These intentions of the enemy were speedily frustrated by Jackson, when, on the 1st of January, 1862, a bright and pleasant day, his army started for Bath, near the line of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad. The army consisted of his own old brigade, commanded by Gen. R. B. Garnett, the three brigades under Loring, a part of the militia, five batteries, and most of Ashby's regiment of cavalry, the whole numbering about 9,000 men. This movement against Bath, if successful, would disperse the enemy at Hancock, destroy communication between General Banks on the east and General Kelley on the west, and by threatening the latter's rear, force him to evacuate Romney or contend with a superior force. Before the first day ended a cold storm set in from the northwest, th
ortal wound, from which he died on the field. Had he lived, wrote Gen. D. H. Hill, his talents, pluck, energy and purity of character must have put him in the front rank of his profession, whether in civil or military life. Brigadier-General Richard Brooke Garnett Brigadier-General Richard Brooke Garnett, a cousin of Gen. R. S. Garnett, was a native of Virginia and a graduate of the same West Point class in which his cousin was a member. Promoted second lieutenant of the Sixth infantry oBrigadier-General Richard Brooke Garnett, a cousin of Gen. R. S. Garnett, was a native of Virginia and a graduate of the same West Point class in which his cousin was a member. Promoted second lieutenant of the Sixth infantry on graduation, he began his services in the field in the Florida war of 1841-42. He subsequently served in garrison at Jefferson barracks, Mo., and on frontier duty at Fort Towson, Indian Territory, and Fort Smith, Ark., and as aide-de-camp to Brigadier-General Brooke at New Orleans. He was promoted first lieutenant in February, 1847, and continued in service, at San Antonio, Tex., and at Fort Pierre, Dak., where he was promoted captain. He assisted in quelling the Kansas disturbances in 1856-
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
Commanding forces in Kanawha Valley, August 12 to September 19, 1861; brigade composed of Twentieth Mississippi and the Thirty-sixth, Fiftieth and Fifty-first Regiments, Virginia Infantry; commanding division at Fort Donelson, Tenn., February, 1862. Samuel Garland, Jr., brigadier-general, May 23, 1862; killed at South Mountain, September 14, 1862. Commands—Brigade composed of Fifth, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Twentieth and Twenty-third Regiments, North Carolina Infantry, A. N. V. Richard Brooke Garnett, major corps of artillery, C. S. A., March 16, 1861; brigadier-general, November 14, 1861; killed at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863, in the charge of Pickett's Division. Commands—Commanding Stonewall Brigade, composed of Second, Fourth, Fifth, Twenty-seventh and Thirty-third Regiments, Virginia Infantry, Jackson's Corps; commanding brigade composed of Eighth, Eighteenth, Nineteenth, Twenty-eighth and Fifty-sixth Regiments, Virginia Infantry; Pickett's Division Robert Selden Garnett,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
ugust 30th, 1862, at 2d Manassas). He was wounded July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg, and was promoted to lieutenant-colonel in early fall of the same year. The brigade was formed of the following Virginia regiments: The Eighteenth, Nineteenth, Twenty-eighth, and Fifty-sixth. In the fall of 1861, the Eighth Virginia Regiment was assigned to the brigade. The brigade commanders were: First Brigadier-General, Philip St. G. Cocke; Second Brigadier-General, George E. Pickett; third brigadier-general Richard B. Garnett. He was killed July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg. Fourth and last Brigadier-General Eppa Hunton, to the close of the war. The brigade belonged to Pickett's division. Peyton, Charles S., captain, wounded in Second Manassas battle, August 30, 1862, left arm amputated; promoted major September 14, 1862, wounded in left leg, July 3, 1863, in battle of Gettysburg. Major Peyton was the only field officer left in the brigade—Garnett's—which he took command of and brought off the field