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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 24 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 4 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee's West Virginia campaign. (search)
ld effect nothing. Shortly afterward, General Robert Garnett was sent by the Confederate authoritieVirginians in their allegiance to the State. Garnett, with a force of about five thousand men, rea force, he made it his first object to attack Garnett before that general could be reinforced (Colot Carrick's Ford, a skirmish ensued, in which Garnett was killed. Colonel Starke, aide-de-camp, relates that, soon after Garnett fell, McClellan arrived on the ground, and recognizing in the prostrdid not attempt to conceal his emotion. Poor Garnett! he exclaimed, has it come to this? Every f Captain Corley, assisted by other members of Garnett's staff, safely continued the retreat, and waate an adventure of De Lagrel, connected with Garnett's defeat, which exhibited great courage, endus courteously received. The defeat of General Garnett left McClellan in undisputed possession oousand men for the purpose of reinforcing General Garnett. These troops were ordered to advance, o
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign in Pennsylvania. (search)
ire. Then Pickett's Division, continuing the charge without supports, and in the sight of the enemy, was not half so formidable or effective as it would have been had trees or hills prevented the enemy from so correctly estimating the strength of the attacking column, and our own troops from experiencing that sense of weakness which the known absence of support necessarily produced. In spite of all this, it steadily and gallantly advanced to its allotted task. As the three brigades under Garnett, Armistead, and Kemper, approach the enemy's lines, a most terrific fire of artillery and small-arms is concentrated upon them; but they swerve not — there is no faltering; steadily moving forward, they rapidly reduce the intervening space, and close with their adversaries; leaping the breastworks, they drive back the enemy, and plant their standard on the captured guns, amid shouts of victory-dearly won and short-lived victory. No more could be exacted, or expected, of those men of bra
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
ad manifested a strong desire to be employed in the operations in that region, and had cherished the ambition of freeing his former home from hostile domination. The Confederates, during the summer, had in that region been unsuccessful. General Robert Garnett had been forced to retreat by General McClellan, and had then met defeat and death at Carrick's ford, on Cheat river, July 13th. This gave the Federals the control of the greater part of Virginia, west of the Alleghenies, and the subseqne by the centre, near the angle presented by that part of the line. Fulkerson's Brigade, holding the extreme Confederate left, firmly maintained his position, but the centre was thinned and worn out by the persistent Federal attacks, until General Garnett, whose brigade was there, deeming it impossible to hold his position longer, ordered a retreat. This, of course, caused the retreat of the whole, which was effected with the loss of two disabled guns, and from two to three hundred prisoners
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 5: invasion of Virginia. (search)
es to the South, was ordered to Yorktown to defend the peninsular route. General Holmes, who had rendered conspicuous service in the army of the United States, was sent to command at Acquia Creek, some twelve miles east of Fredericksburg. Robert Garnett, also an officer of the United States Army, of-tested ability, was ordered to West Virginia to take charge of the department and of the forces assembling in that region. All of these officers had been selected with great care, and had been mI any expectation or wish for it. President Davis holds that position. I have been laboring to prepare and get into the field the Virginia troops to strengthen those from other States, and the threatened commands of Johnston, Beauregard, Huger, Garnett, etc. Where I shall go I do not know, as that will depend upon President Davis. The press on both sides, North and South alike, excited by the probability of a battle, began to severely criticise the delay in decisive movements. They did not
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
ad cherished the ambition of freeing his former home from hostile domination. The Confederates, during the summer, had in that region been unsuccessful. General Robert Garnett had been forced to retreat by General McClellan, and had then met defeat and death at Corrick's Ford on Cheat river, July 13th. This gave the Federals coive of the remnants of the militia brigades, which were not employed any more in active service. It consisted of the five regiments of his old brigade, now under Garnett, of three regiments and one battalion under Burks, and of two regiments under Fulkerson. He had also five batteries and Ashby's regiment of cavalry. General Banrigade, holding the extreme Confederate left, firmly maintained its position, but the centre was thinned and worn out by the persistent Federal attacks, until General Garnett, whose brigade was there, deeming it impossible to hold his position longer, ordered a retreat. This of course caused a retreat of the whole, which was effec
es at Washington invasion of West Virginia by a force under McClellan attack at Philippi; at Laurel Hill death of General Garnett. The border state of Maryland was an outpost of the South on the frontier first to be approached by Northern invaune 2d he was attacked by General McClellan, with a strong force, and withdrew to Laurel Hill. Reenforcements under General Garnett were sent forward and occupied the hill, while Colonel Pegram, the second in command, held Rich Mountain. On July 1of the enemy, and after a vigorous defense, fell back on the 12th, losing many of his men, who were made prisoners. General Garnett, hearing of this reverse, attempted to fall back, but was pursued by McClellan, and while striving to rally his reartreachery confounding the counsels of the brave. Thus occurred the disaster of Rich Mountain and Laurel Hill. General Robert Garnett was a native of Virginia and a graduate of the United States Military Academy. He served in Mexico, on the staff
es of Bull Run with my main force. Patterson having been virtually destroyed, then General Johnston would reenforce General Garnett sufficiently to make him superior to his opponent (General McClellan) and able to defeat that officer. This done, GGeneral Garnett was to form an immediate junction with General Johnston, who was forthwith to cross the Potomac into Maryland with his whole force, arouse the people as he advanced to the recovery of their political rights, and the defense of their h 2. It proposed to continue operations by effecting a junction of a part of the victorious forces with the army of General Garnett in Western Virginia. General Garnett's forces amounted only to three or four thousand men, then known to be in rapidGeneral Garnett's forces amounted only to three or four thousand men, then known to be in rapid retreat before vastly superior forces under McClellan, and the news that he was himself killed and his army scattered arrived within forty-eight hours of Colonel Chesnut's arrival in Richmond. 3. The plan was based on the improbable and inadmiss
ghtfall. During the night Floyd crossed the river and withdrew to the camp of General Wise, to form a junction of the two forces, and together they fell back toward Sewell's Mountain. The unfortunate controversy between these officers, which had prevented cooperation in the past, grew more bitter, and each complained of the other in terms that left little hope of future harmony; this want of cooperation led to confusion, and threatened further reverses. General Loring had succeeded General Garnett, and was in command of the remnant of the force defeated at Laurel Hill. His headquarters were at Valley Mountain. General R. E. Lee, on duty at Richmond, aiding the President in the general direction of military affairs, was now ordered to proceed to western Virginia. It was hoped that, by his military skill and deserved influence over men, he would be able to retrieve the disaster we had suffered at Laurel Hill, and by combining all our forces in western Virginia on one plan of oper
Fox, G. V., 235, 236, 252. Plan for reinforcing Fort Sumter, 233-34, 243, 244. Franklin, Benjamin. Remarks on sovereignty, 122. Free press (Detroit). Remarks on coercion, 221. Free-soil party (See Republican Party). Fremont, Gen. John C., 32, 369. Friends, Society of, 2. Frost, Gen. D. M., 356-57. Fugitives, rendition laws, 12-13, 37, 68-69. G Gage, General, 100-101. Gaillard, John, 9. Gardner, Captain, 326-327. Colonel, 306, 326. Garnett, Gen., Robert, 293-94, 319, 321, 374. Gatchell, William H., 290-91. Georgia. Slavery question, 1, 2. Instructions to delegates to Constitutional convention, 79. Ratification of Constitution, 92. Ordinance of secession, 189. Germantown (ship), 285. Gerry, Elbridge, 86, 117. Gorgas, Gen. J., 409. Chief of ordnance for Confederacy, 269. Extract from monograph on development of ordnance supply, 412-13. Grant, Gen. Ulysses S., 345-46, 347. Greeley, Horace, 219, 252.
Arkansas, receiving his commission July 5, 1861. He was ordered with his regiment to Virginia and assigned to the brigade of Gen. Henry R. Jackson, consisting partly of fresh troops and partly of those who had been in West Virginia under Gen. Robert Garnett. After the remnant of Garnett's command had been recuperated and rested awhile at Monterey, the brigade under Gen. H. R. Jackson advanced to the Greenbrier river and pitched their tents at the head of a beautiful little valley among the AGarnett's command had been recuperated and rested awhile at Monterey, the brigade under Gen. H. R. Jackson advanced to the Greenbrier river and pitched their tents at the head of a beautiful little valley among the Alleghanies, known as the Travelers' Repose. General Lee, who was at this time commanding in Virginia, determined to attack the Federal fortified camp on Cheat mountain. Colonel Rust on a scouting expedition-had discovered a mountain pass, by which he could lead infantry into the rear of the Federal position. He was ordered to lead his regiment to this point, and Gen. Samuel Anderson was directed to support him with two regiments from Loring's command. Henry R. Jackson was to advance with hi
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