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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 3 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 23 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 19 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Richard B. Garnett or search for Richard B. Garnett in all documents.

Your search returned 31 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The lost sword of Gen. Richard B. Garnett, who fell at Gettysburg, (from the Baltimore sun, of November 4, and December 3, 1905.) (search)
er General, U. C. V., with account of how General Garnett met his death. A valuable relic of the. James E. Steuart of the sword of Brig.-Gen. Richard B. Garnett, of the Confederate Army, to his nr 4, has aroused interest in the death of General Garnett, who was killed in Pickett's charge at Geached to protect exposed points in Virginia. Garnett's brigade consisted of five skeleton regimentixth Virginia Regiments. In Pickett's charge Garnett's and Kemper's brigades were aligned, with ArVirginia Infantry, of how Brig. General, Richard B. Garnett met his death at Gettysburg, on the afteng further locomotion. The last I saw of General Garnett he was astride his big black charger in te shot. Just before these men reached us General Garnett's black war horse came galloping toward u had been reported dead. Marylanders with Garnett. At Gettysburg our company was just 10s charge of Pickett's Division at Gettysburg: Garnett, killed on the enemy's line; Armistead, morta[14 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The honor roll of the University of Virginia, from the times-dispatch, December 3, 1905. (search)
T. K., Ala., Seven Pines, Va., 1862. Fowlkes, E., Capt., Va., Seven Pines, Va., 1862. Franklin, J. W., Surg., Va., Pamplins Depot, Va., 1865. Fraser, E. J., Va., 186—. Frazier, J. A., Va., Rockbridge Co., Va., 1862. French, J. B., Adjt., Tex., Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Galt, J., Jr., Va., Fluvanna Co., 1862. Gandy, D. F., Lt., S. C., 1861. Gardner, H. W., Surg., N. C., 1862. Gardner, R. N., Fla., 1862. Garland, Jr., S., Brig.-Gen., Va., Boonsborough, Md., 1862. Garnett, T. S., Col., Va., Chancellorsville, Va., 1863. Garlington, B. C., Lt., S. C., Savage Station, Va. Garrison, W. F., Ga., Seven Pines, Va. Garth, G. M., Va., Alabama, 1862. Gazzam, G. G., Lt., Ala., Mobile, Ala., 1865. Geiger, G. H, Va., Gettysburg, Pa. George, L. A., Lt., Va., Five Forks, Va. Gilchrist, J. M., Capt., Ala., Wilderness, Va. Glenver, J. T., Lt., Va., 1862. Goggin, W. L., Lt., Va., Lynchburg, Va., 1861. Goodloe, D. G., Tenn., Ohio, 1861. Goodma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg-Pickett's charge. (search)
the men. The men with alacrity and cheerfulness fell into line. Kemper's brigade on the right, Garnett's on his left, with Heth's division on the left of Garnett, formed the first line. Armistead'sGarnett, formed the first line. Armistead's brigade moved in rear of Garnett's, and Lane's and Scales' brigades of Pender's division moved in rear of Heth, but not in touch nor in line with Armistead. As the lines cleared the woods that skiGarnett's, and Lane's and Scales' brigades of Pender's division moved in rear of Heth, but not in touch nor in line with Armistead. As the lines cleared the woods that skirted the brow of the ridge and passed through our batteries, with their flags proudly held aloft, waving in the air, with polished muskets and swords gleaming and flashing in the sunlight, they presethe mother of us all, over the loss of so many of her bravest and best sons. Of her generals Garnett is dead, Armistead is dying; and Kemper desperately wounded. Of her colonels of regiments six Three lieutenant-colonels are killed, Calcutt, Wade and Ellis. Five colonels, Hunton, Terry, Garnett, Mayo and Aylett, are wounded. Four lieutenant-colonels commanding regiments, Martin, Carringt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee at Gettysburg. (search)
the Federal right beyond Culp's hill and reach the Baltimore Turnpike, but was repulsed by General Gregg. Would General Meade advance in force? Lee's artillery was put in battery on Semirrary Ridge, and the depleted ranks of the divisions were promptly drawn into line. But both had suffered enormously, and neither was capable of attack. The Confederate loss in the three days was something more than 20,000, one-third of a total of 63,000 of all arms. Dead on the field were Armistead, Garnett, Pender, Barksdale and Semmes. Seriously wounded were Wade, Hampton, Hood, Kemper, Heth, Pettigrew, Trimble, Scales, Jenkins, and S. T. Anderson, while Archer was a prisoner. In an unusual percentage of young regimental and company officers, the flower of the Southland, were left upon the field. Of many of them and a multitude of men in the ranks, the pride and hope of the best of homes, no tidings came back. In unknown graves they sleep, many of them in Hollywood, willing sacrifices, o