hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 37 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 7 5 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Kenner Garrard or search for Kenner Garrard in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

moved on all night. Hardee's head of column, continuing the circuit far enough from Blair to escape attention, made northing and easting enough to be within fiye miles of Decatur by sunrise. Fifteen miles by country roads or paths, or no roads at all, in a dark night, necessarily straggled out the columns of fours. It took considerable time to close up and get in order. The pickets toward Decatur found Sprague's brigade on the alert near that little town. Hardee did not know that our Garrard was gone, and before advancing, his right and rear must be properly cleared by cavalry, so he waited a while for Wheeler. A night march doubly fatigues all troops. Hardee very properly rested and refreshed his men. His deployed front, with its left tangent to the McDonough road, faced westerly. It covered the flank and rear of McPherson's entire force. Hardee now deliberately began his march while Hood in front of Atlanta was holding the forts and curtains opposite Thomas and Schofiel
ad three cavalry divisions of considerable strength-Ed. McCook's, 3,500 effectives, at Turner's Ferry, where the Chattahoochee was bridged; Stoneman's, 2,500, and Garrard's, 4,000, at or near Decatur, Ga., on his left. The cavalry, except Garrard's, received its raiding orders and set forth to go south and carry them out. ShermaGarrard's, received its raiding orders and set forth to go south and carry them out. Sherman now for three or four days strengthened his right flank by putting two infantry divisions of Thomas in rear of my right for a reserve. Sherman was mainly waiting for the effect of this cavalry movement against the railroad about Jonesboro. The first report that came to him, August 1st, to the effect that Ed. McCook's division Ed. McCook and the other commanders, Sherman, with marvelous quickness, had our cavalry reorganized and resupplied. He now formed it into three divisions, under Garrard, McCook, and Kilpatrick. The latter, with his optimistic nature and fearless enterprise, had come back to us after the healing of his Resaca wound. Hood then
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 39: General Hood's northward march; Sherman in pursuit; battle of Allatoona (search)
ed: that was the field works, pretty well constructed, with auxiliary. outworks, which the Union soldiers still held and were defending with extraordinary obstinacy. If this redoubt could be taken, what a clean sweep there would be of Sherman's line of communications between the Chattahoochee Bridge and the crossing of the Etowah. Sherman's force in and. about Atlanta now numbered little over 60,000. General Elliott then commanded the cavalry-two small divisions under Kilpatrick and Garrard. I have a copy of a letter General Sherman wrote, which I have not seen in print — a sort of offhand communication, such as flew from his pen or pencil in times of emergency: Headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, October 2, 1864. General Davis: Communicate with Howard, and be prepared to send into Atlanta all your traps and to move with ten days rations toward Marietta or to Fairburn, as the case may call for; and if Hood has crossed the Chattahoochee with two corps to ta
02, 338, 340, 341, 360, 363, 393, 398. Frisbee, Henry N., 1I, 557. Frissell, H. B., II, 408. Frost, L. S., II, 378. Fry, J. B., 1, 90, 101, 158. Frye, William P., I, 38. Fulkerson, W. H., II, 587. Fuller, J. W., II, 4, 18. Fuller, Melville, I, 39. Fullerton, J. 3., I, 522, 530; II, 216, 241, 297. Gamble, William, I, 406. Gardner, Asa Bird, II, 450. Garland, Samuel, I, 280. Garnett, H. H., II, 317, 320, 321. Garnett, Robert S., I, 54, 435, 439. Garrard, Kenner, I, 520, 528, 542, 579, 590, 592, 594, 595; II, 7, 27, 28. Geary, J. W., I, 430, 432, 433, 461, 465-469, 476, 494, 516, 544, 545, 616-618; II, 94. Gebhart, Mr., II, 536. George, George W., I, 11, 12. George, King of Greece, II, 514. Geronimo, Chief, 11, 551. Getty, George W., I, 345; 11, 450. Gettysburg, Battle of, I, 397-447. Gettysburg, Campaign of, I, 378-396. Gibbon, John, I, 101, 283, 284, 293, 333, 336, 356, 436, 444. Gibson, H. R., II, 587. Kidding,