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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garrett, Thomas 1783-1871 (search)
Garrett, Thomas 1783-1871 Abolitionist; born in Upper Darby, Pa., Aug. 21, 1783; acquired a fortune in the iron business. In 1807 his sympathy for the slaves was first aroused, and for forty years thereafter he aided escaping slaves so skilfully that when their owners found the fugitives had reached his house they generally abandoned the chase. He was instrumental within the limits of the law in liberating about 3,000 slaves from Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia. Later, however, he was forced to part with his whole fortune in paying damages to the owners of runaway slaves. Afterwards his friends loaned him money to again engage in business, and before his death he accumulated a second fortune. He died in Wilmington, Del., Jan. 23, 1871.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
several men on whose heads tens of thousands of dollars had been set; a black woman, who, after escaping from slavery herself, had gone back secretly eight times into the jaws of death to bring out persons whom she had never seen; and a white man, who, after assisting away fugitives by the thousand, had twice been stripped of every dollar of his property in fines, and when taunted by the Court, had mildly said, Friend, if thee knows any poor fugitive in need of a breakfast, send him to Thomas Garrett's door. I had known these, and such as these; but I had not known the Browns. Nothing short of knowing them can be called a liberal education. Lord Byron could not help clinging to Shelley, because he said he was the only person in whom he saw any thing like disinterested benevolence. He really believed that that man would give his life for another. Poor Byron! he might well have exchanged his wealth, his peerage, and his genius for a brief training at North Elba. Let me pause a
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
several men on whose heads tens of thousands of dollars had been set; a black woman, who, after escaping from slavery herself, had gone back secretly eight times into the jaws of death to bring out persons whom she had never seen; and a white man, who, after assisting away fugitives by the thousand, had twice been stripped of every dollar of his property in fines, and when taunted by the Court, had mildly said, Friend, if thee knows any poor fugitive in need of a breakfast, send him to Thomas Garrett's door. I had known these, and such as these; but I had not known the Browns. Nothing short of knowing them can be called a liberal education. Lord Byron could not help clinging to Shelley, because he said he was the only person in whom he saw any thing like disinterested benevolence. He really believed that that man would give his life for another. Poor Byron! he might well have exchanged his wealth, his peerage, and his genius for a brief training at North Elba. Let me pause a
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 4: the reelection of Lincoln.—1864. (search)
em Bishop Potter! Verily Alonzo Potter. the day of miracles is not past. I wrote you, I think, of every important incident connected with our visit to Washington. We left there Friday morning, April 8. and were in the house of dear old Thomas Garrett by 4 1/2 P. M. Wilmington, Del. In the evening there was a good audience to hear Mr. Thompson. As he was rather feeble, I opened the meeting (at his Lib. 34.70. earnest request) by giving the people some account of his life. He followed in a most admirable extemporaneous address, which charmed his auditors, and of which the most radical portions were loudly cheered. The influence on the city was most happy, and dear old Thomas Garrett was more than delighted. . . . To-morrow we are off to Newark, where Mr. Thompson will speak in the evening. Then he will go to New York for a couple of days, and after that to Elmira, Syracuse, Auburn, and Rochester. I need not tell you, my dear Garrison, that I have enjoyed every moment s
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 9: Journalist at large.—1868-1876. (search)
ion. It is sown in dishonor; it is raised in glory. It is sown in weakness; it is raised in power. What a blessed exchange, and how magnificent! You have doubtless heard of the translation of our dear and venerated friend and coadjutor, Thomas Garrett of Wilmington, Delaware. He was one of the grandest men of the ages. The translation of Thomas Garrett was soon followed by that of the beloved and saintly pastor of Syracuse July 1, 1871. himself, and Mr. Garrison journeyed to Central Thomas Garrett was soon followed by that of the beloved and saintly pastor of Syracuse July 1, 1871. himself, and Mr. Garrison journeyed to Central New York to attend the obsequies of this brother beloved incomparably beyond all blood relationship, July 6. to whom he felicitously applied Wordsworth's description of the Happy Warrior. For many years the duties of ministers at large to the come-outers of the anti-slavery host had devolved upon Mr. Garrison and Mr. Phillips, and one or both of them were called to officiate or speak at many a funeral (and doubtless would have been asked to perform many a marriage ceremony, had they possessed t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 10: death of Mrs. Garrison.—final visit to England.—1876, 1877. (search)
was given to Kew, Twickenham, Hampton Court, and June 18. Richmond, and another to the Handel Triennial Festival June 22. at the Crystal Palace. Mr. Garrison attended and spoke briefly at the annual meeting of the National Woman June 21. Suffrage Association; and at a meeting in behalf of the London School of Medicine for Women he listened to June 25. speeches by the Earl of Shaftesbury, Mr. Stansfeld, Mrs. James Stansfeld, Henry Fawcett. Westlake, Prof. Fawcett, Miss Jex Blake, and Dr. Garrett-Anderson. He also heard a liberal discourse by Dean Sophia Jex Blake. Stanley at St. Stephen's. One of his pleasantest mornings June 24. was spent at Argyll Lodge, in Kensington, where he breakfasted with the Duke and Duchess of Argyll and their June 23. daughters,—John Bright, Hon. Charles Howard, and Hon. Lyulph Stanley being the other guests; and he had a cheerful interview also with Lord Houghton, who was just then June 28. confined to his room by a painful accident, but who insi
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
to Auntie Francis wonder at the patience with which she endured all the troublesome traits of her much-loved husband. My dear, she replied, I shipped as Captain's mate, for the voyage! Our mother, quoting this, says, I cannot imagine a more useful motto for married life. During the thirty-four years of her own married life the Doctor was captain, beyond dispute; yet sometimes the mate felt that she must take her own way, and took it quietly. She was fond of quoting the words of Thomas Garrett, Of Wilmington, Delaware. whose house was for years a station of the Underground Railway, and who helped many slaves to freedom. How did you manage it? she asked him. His reply sank deep into her mind. It was borne in upon me at an early period, that if I told no one what I intended to do, I should be enabled to do it. The bond between our mother and father was not to be entirely broken even by death. She survived him by thirty-four years; but she never discussed with any o
I, 265, 269. Frothingham, Octavius, I, 304. Froude, J. A., I, 86. Fuller, Margaret, I, 69, 72, 87, 346; I, 76, 84, 85, 86, 142; II, 404, 405. Furness, W. H., I, 304. Gainsborough, Lady, nx, 6. Gallup, Charles, II, 310. Galveston, II, 279. Gambetta, Leon, II, 25. Garcia method, I, 43. Gardiner, I, 122, 163, 194, 337. Gardiner, J. H., II, 267. Gardner, Mrs., Jack, I, 70, 82, 150, 182, 192. Garfield, J. A., II, 69. Garibaldi, Giuseppe, II, 242. Garrett, Thomas, I, 151. Garrison, F. J., II, 187, 218, 411. Garrison, W. L., I, 240, 345, 362; II, 45, 108, 187, 190. Gautier, Sefior, I, 325, 332. Gay, Willard, I, 298. Gayarre, Judge, II, 103. Geddes, Pres., II, 357. General Federation of Women's Clubs, I, 294, 295, 384; II, 182, 195, 207, 379. Geneva, I, 278, 345; I, 20, 22, 26. Gennadius, John, II, 6. George I, II, 44. George IV, I, 262. George, Henry, II, 247. Georgetown, I, 12. Germany, I, 147, 197; II,
1861. Negro Hiring.1861.Abner W. Richardson Gives his personal attention to the Hiring of Negroes, Renting Out Houses, and selling country Produce generally. Refers to Major Roderick Bland, King & Queen; Thomas Garrett. King William; D. W Marston, James City county; Col. Theo Lacy, New Kent; Joshua Garrett, Gloucester; Geo. P. Richardson and Jno. S. Rogers, Halifax county de 21--2w*
1861. Negro Hiring. 1861.Abner W. Richardson Gives his personal attention to the Hiring of Negroes, Renting Out Houses, and selling country Produce generally. Refers to Major Roderick Bland, King & Queen; Thomas Garrett. King William; D. W. Marston, James City county; Col, Theo Lacy, New Kent; Joshua Garrett, Gloucester; Geo. P. Richardson and Jno. S. Rogers, Halifax county. de 21--2w*
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