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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 10 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
in the best possible manner. The relief which has been given to my anxious mind is more than words can express. Most sincere and heartfelt is my gratitude to the Giver of every good and perfect gift. James and Lucretia Mott, Isaac Winslow and company, and many other friends, both English and American, are pouring in their congratulations. What name shall be given to our new comer? is the question. I will not attempt to decide, until my return. Elizabeth Neall says, Call him Charles Follen Garrison. Lucretia Mott and bro. Rogers think the name should be Edmund Quincy Garrison. There are many dear friends, and many good names, from which to make a selection. The lock of hair forwarded by bro. J. is pronounced by all to be very Oliver Johnson. beautiful, and I gaze upon it with rapturous delight. The babe is a boy—ah! you are disappointed, and so am I; for we had both fondly hoped that it would prove to be a girl. But the gift is none the less precious, and I am thankful,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ass. A. S. Society. See, for the whole story, Lib. 12.171,174, 175, 178, 179, 186, 187, 199, 205; 13: 34; Mss. Nov. 5, 1842, A. A. Phelps to F. Jackson, Dec. 18, N. Barney to F. Jackson, Jan. 29, 1843, E. Quincy to R. D. Webb, and an unpublished communication to the Courier by F. Jackson, Nov. 17, 1842. Add Whittier's true Northern lyric, Massachusetts to Virginia (Lib. 13: 16). The Liberator has just come, and is extremely interesting. A thousand kisses for you and the babe Charles Follen Garrison, born in Cambridgeport, Mass., Sept. 9, 1842. and boys, and love to all. W. L. Garrison to his Wife. Syracuse, Nov. 27, 1842. Ms. I wrote to you a hasty letter from Waterloo, giving you some of the outlines of my visit to Rochester. Although many interesting events have occurred since that time, I shall wait till I see you before I go into the particulars. Up to this hour, I have enjoyed myself far beyond my expectations. The spirit of hospitality, in this section, exc
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 9: Father Mathew.—1849. (search)
poses this behavior in the Liberator, and makes Father Mathew's Southern tour both easy and difficult. Death of Charles Follen Garrison. Garrison vindicates free discussion of the Bible in the Liberator. The historian of the anti-slavery cause—Garrison vindicates free discussion of the Bible in the Liberator. The historian of the anti-slavery cause—or of the country—for the year we have now reached, must tell of the two great tides of feeling and passion surging from North to South and from South to North, over the question of the Federal Territories. Should the Wilmot Proviso secure to Califoturally, the Lib. 18.74. subject was prominent in Calhoun's Address, and it was Ante, p. 245. upon this portion that Mr. Garrison proudly but overconfidently commented, when he said: The times have indeed changed, and a radical alteration Lidate of his Eastern visit afforded the fittest possible opportunity for extending the following invitation, drafted by Mr. Garrison, who was made chairman of the committee charged with presenting it: Boston, July 26, 1849. Lib. 19.126. Este<