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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 7 1 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 2: Boyhood.—1805-1818. (search)
]. . . . I have heard nothing from James. I do not know whether he is dead or alive. May God protect you in all your undertaking! I do long to see you, and my heart is ofttimes full when I think of you, my dear Lloyd. Be a good boy and God will bless [you], and you have a Mother, although distant from you, that loves you with tenderness. I will do everything for you I can; it will be my greatest happiness to make you happy. Write soon to her who is your tender and affectionate Frances M. Garrison. It is easy to see what influence such motherly epistles as these must have had upon the lad who was just entering his teens, and to understand the love and reverence in which he ever held the memory of his parent. I always feel like a little boy when I think of Mother, he used to say in after years; and he never doubted that he had her strengthening and inspiring influence, and her constant approbation, through all his stormy career. Many years after her death he thus wrote of
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 3: Apprenticeship.—1818-1825. (search)
y God bless you and be with you all the days of your life, is my ardent prayer. . . . Will you be so kind as to bring on your pieces that you have written for me to see? . . . Adieu, my dear, for I am tired. Your affectionate Mother, Frances M. Garrison. Lloyd embarked from Boston for Baltimore on June 21, 1823. He had never been in Boston before, and it is evident from the letter which he wrote to his master from Baltimore that he did not enjoy his day's experience there: You w devoted to her. Her son recorded her decease in the Newburyport Herald of September 9, 1823, as follows: died. In Baltimore, 3rd inst., after a long and distressing illness, which she bore with Christian fortitude and resignation, Mrs. Frances Maria Garrison, relict of the late Capt. Abijah G., formerly of this town, aged 45. [The printers of the Eastport Sentinel and St. John Star are requested to copy this death into their respective papers.] With three exceptions, when he contribut
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. (search)
Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. At the close of his apprenticeship, Garrison establishes in Newburyport the free Press, and brings Whittier to light. XVII Although his own political sympathies and affiliations were with the Federalists and their successors, the Federal Republicans, it was Mr. Allen's effort so to conduct the Herald as to secure the good — will and patronage of all parties in the community, and the paper was classed as independent, which signified in those days neutrality and a willingness to admit communications from both parties to its columns. So far was this from satisfying the Democrats of Newburyport and vicinity, however, that they tried, in 1824, to establish a newspaper of their own, under the title of the Northern Chronicler. The venture was unsuccessful, and the paper was sold, in June, 1825, to Isaac Knapp, 3rd, who changed its name to the Essex Courant and published it as a neutral paper until the following spring, the last issue b