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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 23 1 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 3: the Proclamation.—1863. (search)
the army after the adoption of the emancipation policy, eagerly embraced this opportunity of serving the cause of liberty in the way of all others that he would have chosen. The father did not shrink from the test. W. L. Garrison to George T. Garrison. Boston, June 11, 1863. Ms. Though I could have wished that you had been able understandingly and truly to adopt those principles of peace which are so sacred and divine to my own soul, yet you will bear me witness that I have not laidarade on the Common was abandoned, and the troops marched across the city with loaded muskets, ready for a possible attack in the Irish quarter of the North End, where they embarked on a steamer for North Carolina. W. L. Garrison to George T. Garrison. Boston, August 6, 1863. Ms. We have all been made very glad, to-day, by the receipt of your pencilled note, dated Hatteras Inlet, July 31st, announcing your safe arrival at Newbern, though a little surprised at N. C. your sudden remo
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 5: the Jubilee.—1865. (search)
wn song; and when Lieut. Lib. 35.39. George Thompson Garrison halted his company in the streets, hens were broken open, and mottoes from Isaiah, Garrison, and John Brown inscribed Lib. 35.39. thereinal, who had brought them from Charleston. Mr. Garrison's ascent of the steps, from which he made hlicity in enslaving their fellow-creatures, Mr. Garrison felt that the time had come for him to preplmed by their tokens of joy and gratitude. Mr. Garrison was one of the multitude assembled in Faneu York to Charleston. On reaching New York, Mr. Garrison received the following telegram: Wadjutant-General has been directed to give Captain Garrison a furlough while you are at Charleston. I hope Mr. Lieut. G. T. Garrison. Thompson accompanies you. A formal invitation was forwarded to before me continually. Will it not be a G. T. Garrison. joyful surprise to him to meet me and Mr.orge, I have not yet seen him, but expect G. T. Garrison. to in the course of a few hours. He retu