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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 90 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
of the Lib. 14.201. South dissolved all connection with their brethren of the North—a foreshadowing of the greater disunion in store for the two sections. Towards the close of the year, the Garrison family was blessed with a girl, Helen Frances Garrison, born Dec. 16, 1844, and named for her mother and paternal grandmother. You know they have a little daughter, wrote Ann Phillips to Elizabeth Pease. Garrison is tickled to death with it (Ms. Jan. (?), 1845). We shall demand for her thections. Towards the close of the year, the Garrison family was blessed with a girl, Helen Frances Garrison, born Dec. 16, 1844, and named for her mother and paternal grandmother. You know they have a little daughter, wrote Ann Phillips to Elizabeth Pease. Garrison is tickled to death with it (Ms. Jan. (?), 1845). We shall demand for her the rights of a human being, though she be a female, wrote the happy father to Mrs. Louisa Loring (Ms. Jan. 11, 1845). much longed for by her parents
lemen, not abolitionists, were such as caused Garrison to be mobbed ten years ago, and such as we thWe always said it would, and were laughed at. Garrison grew popular and was Ms. Feb. 24, 1845. chosended in a golden G. S. Hillard. shower; but Garrison's fell in fiery rain. It seemed doubtful, atnded in words, words. Did they mean, asked Mr. Garrison, to act that farce over again? Charles Frain adjourned Lib. 15.163. till October 21. Mr. Garrison spoke on both occasions, Lib. 15.163, 174.e. Calhoun wants it at one end of the Union— Garrison wants it at the other. It is written in the ists. Apparently, Ms. Mar. 1, 1845. wrote Mr. Garrison to Richard Webb, with reference to annexatinotified the same correspondent in regard to Garrison—He is in good spirits,. . . . as he always ist found a cordial welcome in the Liberator. Mr. Garrison recalled his first visit to England in 1833n Phonographic Society. Of this Society Mr. Garrison became an officer, and his Lib. 15.132. fr[14 more...]<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
uary 30, 1846, the following resolution, of Mr. Garrison's moving, was adopted: That the speciald by one privately addressed on April 27 by Mr. Garrison to the Lib. 16.73. Rev. William Chalmers, d Organization, and in especial on Wright and Garrison for their Sabbatarian heresies. On April 21,f the Society a resolution of sympathy with Mr. Garrison and his co-workers, and an invitation to co very tempting. The opening year had found Mr. Garrison in poor health and much pecuniary embarrasst Wendell Phillips expressed in writing to Mrs. Garrison of Ms. July 22, 1846. her husband: I thinive increase of Ante, 2.363. the family. Mrs. Garrison, with her customary self-abnegation, interposed no obstacles. In short, Mr. Garrison yielded, and sailed from Boston in the steamship Britan-dent, Edmund Quincy, who wrote by the hand of Garrison (Ms. July 14, 1846): You will be glad enough The first attraction and occupation for Mr. Garrison was the World's Temperance Convention, held[6 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
ampton, July 18, 1848. Ms. The trip in the cars to this place, yesterday, was much more pleasant than the one I took with Fanny, as the heat was much Helen Frances Garrison. less intense; but the dust and smoke were quite as disagreeable—so that I was not sorry when I arrived at the depot. There I met with our old friend Davme and my baggage, with Mr. Child and Mrs. Hammond Eliza P. Hammond, formerly of New Ipswich, N. H., where her husband, an amateur portrait painter, had had Mr. Garrison for a sitter in January, 1844. (whom we took up by the way), to Bensonville. On the way, we discussed the affairs of the nation as vigorously and actively as tent that her absence must necessarily require. With us, and many others, he regretted the step, and thought it an ill-advised one. To Mrs. Chapman herself Mr. Garrison wrote on the following day (Ms. July 19, 1848): How to feel resigned to your separation from our little antislavery band by a foreign residence of years, I sc